Tag Archives: Blog of Holding

Weekly Roundup: Kickstarter Fatigue Edition

I’m not sure what it is or why, but I’ve had some Kickstarter fatigue lately. Perhaps it’s because it seems like everybody and their brother has  Kickstarter that I “really need to support.” Not that the projects aren’t cool, because most of them are. I’m just a little burnt out on it. So I’ll be staying away for a while, maybe until some of the stuff I’ve already supported actually comes in. :-)

First up, I HAVE to mention the Deck of Many Things for Gamma World that was posted at Conversations and Other Words this week. The art was done by Wes Hall, and we mentioned that some was leaked on Twitter a few weeks ago. The rules were written by Michael Robles. Now you can get the whole deck, and rules, for free. Awesome!

This week, Nearly Enough Dice blogged about using new systems for one-shots. A great way to try a new system without committing to an entire campaign.

Blog of Holding talks about why 2nd Edition is due for a comeback. Agree or disagree, some interesting thoughts here.

RPG Musings makes a case for using maps and minis in D&D Next. I certainly love minis and maps, and have also used theater of the mind, but couldn’t imagine (see what I did there) eschewing maps and minis altogether.

Tao of D&D posted a cool list of adventure hooks that relates to some current events in the far east. I love the idea of using real events as jumping off points to in game story arcs.

One Inch Square continued his “Dungeon Command By The Numbers” series by analyzing Tyranny of Goblins. Perhaps I will get to play Kato in Dungeon Command some day…

If you’re looking for a really cool dungeon map, look no further than Crypt Thing. Looks like this is just level one folks, so there’s sure to be more of these awesome maps.

Finally, Jennisodes is running a contest – win a copy of Eaten By Zombies. Just enter your email address on her blog (on the sidebar). And while you’re at it, check out her interview with Robin D. Laws!

Blast From The Past (Weekly Roundup: Hirst Model On Ebay Edition)

Have kids? Young kids? Maybe it’s time you let your 4 year old DM! That was the gist of the article at Kids Dungeon Adventure this week. 

Weekly Roundup: Out Of The Loop Edition

Well, we’ve been out of the D&D loop this week. We had a lot of stuff going on, and did a lot of board gaming. However, we haven’t had a chance to keep an eye on what’s going on in the D&D universe. If you’ve got kids, we will point you to the Story Realms Kickstarter (see the sidebar) which we think is pretty cool, but other than that, RPGs have been out this past week. Don’t worry, it’s because we’re working on a few really cool things. You will see…. you will see….

So first, before you read on, you need to know whether you’re enough of a geek to continue on to the articles. Check out this video by Geeky Hostess to find out.

Meta Gamemastery posted a recording from PAX this week that discusses D&D vs. Story Games. Lots of people on Twitter thought it was worth a listen, and we agree. Check it out.

We are all about “less prep” and more “flying by the seat of your pants” when it comes to running a D&D game. That’s why we love these tools for the lazy DM posted by IntWisCha this week.

We don’t usually link things from WotC in the weekly roundup, but we thought a couple of articles this week were interesting enough to do so. First, RPG design philosophy, and also adding intrigue and mystery to your campaign.

Blog of Holding wrapped up his “New schooler reads OD&D” series with a look at encumbrance. Also, definitely check out the other four parts of the series.

Finally, with Halloween less than two months away, it’s time to think about your “Halloween Adventure.” You know, the one that incorporates horror. Look no further than the picture inspirations posted by Gothridge Manor this week. Creepy stuff indeed. (Probably shouldn’t click on that one right before bed…)

Blast From The Past (Weekly Roundup: End Of Campaign Edition)

Some Space to Think mused upon the differences between 4e and 1e – from a first person perspective.

Weekly Roundup: Tweet RPG Edition

If you’re one of those people who sometimes wonder what Twitter is “for,” then perhaps this is right up your alley – it’s an RPG game that is being run on Twitter for whomever wishes to take part. It’s called Tweet RPG, and players collectively control a single character by following the story and voting on next actions. Catch up on the story, get a Twitter account, and dive in! And while you’re at it, follow us on Twitter too…

Over at Blog of Holding, there was an article about some designers’ comments trying to allay fears about 2nd edition D&D. Some sounds familiar; be sure to read the comments as well for a good dialogue. It’s also interesting to note that we saw a lot of the same fan comments in the magazines when D&D moved to 3rd edition.

At his WotC blog, Jester talks about what the playtest process is. This is a good companion article to the one we linked to at Greywulf’s Lair a few weeks ago.

Geek Native had a cool infographic this week about the history of dice. It includes a d20 from Roman times, a d12 from Egyptian times, as well as lots of other dice related archaeological finds.

There was a great post at ENWorld this week about how to run a great convention game. With “Con Season” coming up, this post couldn’t be more timely.

Frivology tackled the thorny subject of sexism in gaming. While this subject has tons of diverse viewpoints, it’s always interesting to hear a female’s point of view (especially in a hobby dominated by males).

Finally, speaking of ladies in the hobby, over at Character Generation Liz waxes philosophical about not feeling “geek enough.”

Blast From The Past (Weekly Roundup: 100th Post Giveaway Edition)

Over at his own blog, Geek Ken asked an important question that deserves an answer: Where is the WotC support for Gamma World? 

Weekly Roundup: Site of the Year Voting Edition

As you may or may not know, Stuffer Shack has an “RPG Site of the Year” contest every year. As their site of the month for last September, Roving Band of Misfits was automatically entered into the contest. Without going into too much detail, you’ll be able to vote for our site on Thursday of this week, and we encourage you to do so! (Don’t worry, we’ll remind you again)

If you missed the D&D Next seminar at PAX East last week, you can catch the whole thing over at ENWorld. This is a must see if you want the most up to date info from the designers themselves.

Blog of Holding had some deep thoughts about monsters this week – what kinds of traces do the monsters leave behind? What kinds of clues would they leave? Not only does “Monster Traces” lend a sense of realism to the campaign, but it also can create mystery, or even a sense of dread for the players.

Looking for an interesting encounter this week? Check out the D&D burglar alarm encounter presented by Breakfast for Owlbears.

Thoughtcrime Games posted some thoughts on motivations for characters that extend beyond mere survival. Good thoughts, especially when we realize that our days are filled with more motivation than “survival instinct.” What drives your character?

Of course, we can never let a good arts & crafts article go by without adding it to the roundup. This week, The She DM added even more tentacles to your box of minis. (You may remember the article we did a while back that added onto her original tentacle article)

Finally, some thoughts from Critical Hits on the different kinds of mapping that exists in D&D combat – gridded, theater of the imagination, and more. What are the pros and cons?

Blast From The Past (Weekly Roundup: Changes to the Podcast Edition)

Neuroglyph Games had a thought-provoking article on character optimization.  Agree or disagree?  Leave them a comment!  (We do see his point, though we wish he would have also addressed living campaigns)

Weekly Roundup: New Homebrew Campaign Edition

This coming weekend, our group is going to be starting a new 4e homebrew campaign. A little Greyhawk, and a little special ops, we’re pretty excited to get going on it. If you want to hear more, stay tuned for our next podcast, hopefully going up sometime this week.

Kobold Quarterly posted its first article by WotC alum Steve Winter this week. He talks about lethality in D&D, and whether you should expect your character to survive until level 30. If you want more of Steve’s musings, he has his own blog at Howling Tower.

About a month ago, we posted an article on making an interesting solo in 10 seconds. Extended Rest tried the technique and blogged about it. See how it turned out!

If you’ve ever played one of those old school “text adventure” computer games, you’ll enjoy the Exits Are project. While not an RPG, per se, it’s very RPG-ish, and very cool.

Blog of Holding wrapped up its series “Playing D&D With Mike Mornard.” Check out all seven parts, they’re all good. (Mike Mornard played in Gary Gygax’s D&D game, as well as Dave Arneson’s)

What do you do when a party goal could be accomplished most easily by a single character? The Dungeon’s Master tackled the question this week.

If you’ve played Revenge of the Iron Lich, be sure to head over to Save vs. Death to leave your first impressions and memories. RotIL turned 1 this week!

Finally, check out the new animated webseries from ENWorld called “The Perturbed Dragon.” The prologue is currently up for your viewing pleasure.

Blast From The Past (Weekly Roundup: Who Wins The Free Book Edition)

The Hopeless Gamer had an amazing guest post detailing how to make a ravine for your miniature game terrain.  Say it with me: Arts…..And…..Crafts!!!

Weekly Roundup: How We Find Our Articles Edition

We’ve been doing a weekly roundup for over six months now.  Some of you may be wondering, how do they find the blog articles for the Roving Band of Misfit’s Weekly Roundup?  Or maybe not.  Either way, we’re going to tell you.  There are several sources we have for articles:

  1. Twitter.  If someone we follow Tweets an interesting article, we give it a look.
  2. 4eblogs.com.  There’s no archive on this site, so if we don’t notice something in the first few days, we generally don’t notice it.  Also, the list of contributors to that site is short, and we like to keep the articles diverse.  So we don’t lean too heavily there.
  3. RPGbloggers.com.  As to the number of contributors, completely the opposite of 4eblogs.  Sometimes a single day’s worth of blog posts goes on for a few pages.  As to the amount of posts we have to sift through to find an interesting, relevant article… also the opposite.  We generally scan the headlines, and if something grabs our interest, we’ll read the article.  Since this site does have an archive, we can go back over the week’s blog postings at our leisure.

Next time, we’ll discuss how we pick articles, and what causes something to catch our eye.  But for now, some articles!

Paul from Blog of Holding posted an amazing graphic depicting all the monsters in MM1 by level and environment.  We can’t imagine how much time this took…

Dread Gazebo posted a homebrew skill specialization system for 4e that we really like.  Be sure to give him feedback (positive or negative) so he can refine the rules.

Every month, Wastex Games has been hosting a contest on their blog.  For May, the contest was “Tribes of the Land” where entrants were challenged to come up with a unique tribe of monsters.  We especially liked Wes Hall’s entry, which was presented this week: The Stone Raiders, a tribe of Cockatrice riding Goblins.  No, you read that right.

Trollish Delver had some interesting thoughts on why we may gravitate towards lower level characters.  You should weigh in on how you feel, as his musings are largely open-ended.  We’re especially interested in what The ID DM has to say, from a psychology standpoint… (As an aside, there’s a mention in the article of the Dungeon Crawl Classics; for more on that check out this article from Beyond the Black Gate)

Big Ball of No Fun posted a great way to get quick and easy building floorplans on the fly.  Just another reason to have a computer handy when you play.  (Don’t tell me that my players are the only ones who go off script and wander into random buildings….)

Finally, remember that episode of Community everyone was talking about a few months back?  The one where the cast plays D&D for the entire episode?  The A.V. Club posted an interview with Dan Harmon (Community’s creator) this week where he comments on the making of the episode.  You have to scroll down a bit; look for the picture of Chevy Chase holding the D&D adventure.

What cool articles did we miss this week?

Weekly Roundup – D&D Perfume Edition

So, here’s something interesting we stumbled across this week: you can make your own D&D perfume at Black Phoenix Alchemy Lab’s website simply by choosing a race, class, and alignment combo.  Interesting, at the very least, and the prices don’t seem too out of line with how much fragrances cost elsewhere.  We wonder what a chaotic neutral halfling rogue smells like…. and now, while you ponder that, read some of this week’s articles!

At-Will had a discussion of what sorts of challenges you should throw at your epic tier players.  No, not what sorts of monsters.  What sorts of challenges.  Check it out if you’re struggling with your epic tier storyline.

Speaking of campaign hooks The Undungeon was the topic of a massive post over at Greywulf’s Lair this week.  If you’re looking to start a new campaign soon, this article could be a great resource for you, and is chock full of ideas to steal.

Just yesterday, Dave the Game posted a discussion of the economics of pricing plastic miniatures over at Critical Hits.  If you’re interested in why WotC discontinued their minis line, this article pulls back the curtain a bit.

Over at the Wizards of the Coast community blogs, we noticed a new article by The Jester who had a great discussion of balance in games.  Is it good?  Can it be ignored?  Read and decide.

Blog of Holding had a discussion of why he thinks that 4e does not, in fact, discourage roleplaying.  An old discussion, I know, but worth checking out, as he makes some points that you may not have heard before.

In case you missed it,  Newbie DM made a call to all you DMs out there for pictures of your DM’s binder.  We use a clipboard, but if you use a binder, feel free to submit it to the gallery.

Finally, as you may or may not know, Star Wars day was this past week – May the fourth.  As in, “May the fourth be with you.”  In celebration of this “holiday,” we point you to Death Star PR‘s 10 Easy Ways to Celebrate Star Wars Day.  Yes, we know it’s not D&D related, but considering our audience, we thought it was relevant.  Plus, we chuckled.

How did you celebrate Star Wars day?

Weekly Roundup – Game Design Challenge Edition

Recently, we were browsing the interwebs, and stumbled across The Thousand Year Game design challenge. It piqued our interest, as we have a (non-RPG) game that we were developing at one point, but eventually shelved it for lack of time.  Time to dust off the notes, and finish it!

Let’s kick things off with a post by NewbieDM wondering where his group’s 4e burnout is coming from.  He has a theory, though we’re not sure that complexity, from the player’s side, has changed that much since the last edition.

You should also check out the “Anti-Defender” rant over at The Dungeon’s Master.  We’ll note that this is a guest post – at any rate, feel free to weigh in with your thoughts.

Dave the Game over at Critical Hits had such great things to say about Mage: The Ascension, that we wanted to get our hands on a copy just to see what all the love was about.

Points of Light was one of the many places talking about D&D’s upcoming “Fortune Cards,” which will function something like Gamma World’s alpha mutation cards, or if you remember them, the living campaigns’ rewards cards.

Alex Schroeder pointed us to a few options for creating a campaign wiki, and gave us a few reasons why we should start one.

Finally, Blog of Holding posted some unofficial Gamma World errata.  Check out what they think is broken about the game.  They have stuff from both the basic set and the Famine in Far-Go expansion. 

Leave shameless self-promotion for your blog in the comments!