Tag Archives: Breakfast for Owlbears

Weekly Roundup: CONCurrent Edition

Perhaps you’re not going to GenCon. Perhaps you’re upset about that, and would still like to do some gaming that weekend. Have no fear – CONCurrent is an online gaming con that runs parallel to GenCon. You can check out their offerings here. There’s already a bunch of stuff listed to play, and there’s sure to be more as the event draws near. Is it the same as GenCon? Of course not. Is it a great alternative if you can’t make it to GenCon? Absolutely. Check it out, make some new friends, and learn some new games.

We don’t usually post articles from earlier than the previous week, but we have been known to make exceptions. Last week, we somehow missed this awesome roundup of all sorts of gaming aids over at Going Last. This is one you need to bookmark as a resource.

Don’t know if you’ve heard about this or not, but there’s a new, free, D&D-ish RPG out there called Heroes Against Darkness. It’s worth a look, if only for its price tag. Check out what Neuroglyph Games thought of it too.

Daily Encounter brought a little Greyhawk flavor into the Netheril 4e setting by designing a new secret society, and related theme. It’s part of the “Classics Return” blog carnival. (They’re accepting submissions until Aug 14, so if you have an RPG blog, get on that!)

Stuffer Shack recently ran a “Best Worst Villain” contest. We tried to choose one or two for the roundup, but we couldn’t. There are TONS of great ideas for villains here, so check out the list of all their entries.

The Welsh Piper has a great random table this week for creating religious orders. Perhaps they’ll figure prominently in your campaign, or perhaps the PCs stumbled across one. Either way, the article is a great primer, and the table is a quick way to generate one.

Big Ball of No Fun gives us some good ideas for making an NPC memorable, even when the PCs aren’t interacting directly with them. Keeping key NPCs in the forefront of the players mind is a great trick.

Finally, have you been wondering about Dungeon Command? Check out the review over at Breakfast for Owlbears. It makes us want to give it a try…

Blast From The Past (Weekly Roundup: 2011 GenCon Schedule Edition)

Dice Monkey started a new series hacking Gamma World into traditional D&D. Also note the link in the article to Chaos Grenade, who is doing something similar.

 

Weekly Roundup: DnDpr Edition

If you haven’t seen it yet, you should check out the new DnDpr Tumblr, which is a spoof on NPR. So public radio from a high fantasy point of view. It’s pretty funny, and we hope to hear a lot more from these guys in the future. On to the articles…

First up this week, we have a great feel good story that made us smile. If someone tells you gaming is a waste of time, just point them to this story from Breakfast for Owlbears.

Neuroglyph Games had a great article on how the new bounded accuracy rules will change the game. Some great thoughts, and even a little bit of D&D history.

In case you hadn’t heard, there is going to be a new D&D movie released on the SyFy channel titled “The Book of Vile Darkness.” After seeing the trailer, Randall over at This Is My Game posted his thoughts (including what they should have made).

IntWisCha wrote an article this week that responds to the contention that you’re not roleplaying if you’re using disassociated mechanics. Don’t worry if you don’t know what that is… there’s an explanation.

It’s no secret that WotC is planning on making the rules of D&D Next modular. It’s being touted as a feature. Well, this week Jester made a pretty comprehensive list of optional rules modules that he hopes to see.

Starting a new campaign sometime soon? Did your character just die, and you need to make a new one? Check out the advice Reality Refracted gave on creating character backstory.

The Douchey DM had a great idea for making a better DM screen. When you’re familiar with the rules, what do you use that real estate for? Try this, and see how your game goes.

Finally, The She DM posted a short article with her thoughts about how the loss of interrupts in the current D&D Next rules has made the game worse for her. We’d tend to agree, and (on the podcast) have often spoken about how interrupts engage players even when it’s not their turn.

Blast From The Past (Weekly Roundup: Beyond the Stat Block Edition)

NewbieDM had a guest article on making flying stands for minis.  We’ve been thinking about doing this very thing for a while now (even have the extendable “antennas” sitting around here somewhere), so it was nice to see a tutorial to save on trial and error.  These look really good!

Weekly Roundup: Site of the Year Voting Edition

As you may or may not know, Stuffer Shack has an “RPG Site of the Year” contest every year. As their site of the month for last September, Roving Band of Misfits was automatically entered into the contest. Without going into too much detail, you’ll be able to vote for our site on Thursday of this week, and we encourage you to do so! (Don’t worry, we’ll remind you again)

If you missed the D&D Next seminar at PAX East last week, you can catch the whole thing over at ENWorld. This is a must see if you want the most up to date info from the designers themselves.

Blog of Holding had some deep thoughts about monsters this week – what kinds of traces do the monsters leave behind? What kinds of clues would they leave? Not only does “Monster Traces” lend a sense of realism to the campaign, but it also can create mystery, or even a sense of dread for the players.

Looking for an interesting encounter this week? Check out the D&D burglar alarm encounter presented by Breakfast for Owlbears.

Thoughtcrime Games posted some thoughts on motivations for characters that extend beyond mere survival. Good thoughts, especially when we realize that our days are filled with more motivation than “survival instinct.” What drives your character?

Of course, we can never let a good arts & crafts article go by without adding it to the roundup. This week, The She DM added even more tentacles to your box of minis. (You may remember the article we did a while back that added onto her original tentacle article)

Finally, some thoughts from Critical Hits on the different kinds of mapping that exists in D&D combat – gridded, theater of the imagination, and more. What are the pros and cons?

Blast From The Past (Weekly Roundup: Changes to the Podcast Edition)

Neuroglyph Games had a thought-provoking article on character optimization.  Agree or disagree?  Leave them a comment!  (We do see his point, though we wish he would have also addressed living campaigns)