Tag Archives: Campaign Mastery

Weekly Roundup: Ennies Voting Is Open Edition

Voting for the Ennies is only open for the next week, so head on over there and vote (the link opens in a new window so you can let it sit while you peruse the roundup). Befoe you head over there though, we want to note this, which is in the voting instructions: Before voting, please take the time to familiarize yourself with the products. The product titles link to their publisher’s websites, allowing you to learn more about that product. The Ennies are not a popularity contest. Don’t vote for something just because it was made by a publisher you like, even if you haven’t seen the actual product. Take a little bit of time to get to know all the products in a category, or don’t vote in that category at all. Let’s make this the best Ennies ever!

This week, The She DM wrote up a great analysis of how much the new WotC Dungeon Command game costs vs. how much you’d pay on the secondary market for the same miniatures. If you’re just going to buy Dungeon Command for the miniatures, this article is a must read.

Reality Refracted has some great advice for long time GMs who make the switch to the other side of the screen. Sometimes it’s difficult to go from GM to player, and this is some great advice for those who change up their role.

Campaign Mastery wrote a very in-depth article on investigative adventures, and the different ways to lead PCs from Mystery to Solution. This is a long one folks, so set some time aside, but definitely worth a read if you’re thinking about this type of adventure in the near future. (We also have some advice from a while back…)

If you’re looking for something more bite-sized, check out the quick paragraph that Joe the Lawyer wrote about what makes for the best D&D groups.

If you have little ones, and love Gencon, make sure you check out Dread Gazebo‘s article on bringing kids to Gencon. Of course, every child is different, but the advice here is solid. (We might also note that this article goes hand in hand with the one by Avy Valentine which was linked last week.)

Sly Flourish posted some great advice on how to tie PCs to a prepublished adventure. For many DMs, the inability to fit something prepublished into their campaign keeps them from using prepublished resources. Try some of these tricks to personalize prepublished adventures.

Finally, you may have heard about the new RPG coming out called 13th Age. And you may have some questions. If so, check out the 13 facts about 13th Age posted this week at their site. Looks like a fun system.

Blast From The Past (Weekly Roundup: Loot! Edition)

A Character For Every Game [now Dyson’s Dodecahedron] posted a roundup of maps from around the blogosphere.  If you’re as into maps as he is, check it out.  It’s a great source of bloggers who regularly post maps to steal.  We love a good roundup!

Weekly Roundup: Modified Mini Edition

 Waaaay back many months ago, we had a contest to celebrate our 100th post. We must talk a good game on the blog here because one of the winners of the contest asked for a miniature modification that was way beyond our ability to do. So, instead of just saying “no,” we reached out to Ian from the Going Last Podcast to see if he was willing to help us out. He accepted the challenge, and below are the stunning results. 

Our contest winner wanted to make the D&D Dire Ape miniature look like Donkey Kong. Here is what the Dire Ape looks like:

  

I had a barrel from Showcase Terrain that I sent to Ian along with the mini. Ian cut the raised fist off, sculpted a hand around the barrel, and reattached it to the mini. The bottom of the barrels are smooth, so he added planks to the bottom of the barrel. He also added a tie to the mini, and built out the lower jaw a bit. Below are pictures of the finished product. (Click for big)

 

And now, on to the roundup…

We always like to see character backgrounds that are not “My character is an orphan.” If you’re looking for ideas, check out the Dungeon’s Master Origin Story switched at birth.

If you’re a fan of random tables, you need to check out the one posted at Land of Nod this week. It’s a Random Idol Generator. Even if you don’t use it in a game on the fly, it is sure to give you some ideas!

Rumor has it that the D&D Next playtest at DDXP was in the classic Caves of Chaos. Check out the work The Weem did this week on the Caves of Chaos Map Remakes. They look awesome!

The wishlists for D&D Next continue. Check out what Squaremans said about his D&D and his non-rules wishlist for D&D Next.

Campaign Mastery‘s article on alternate histories in RPGs was geared more towards an RPG that diverges from actual world history into a fictional world history, but it could also be applied to fantasy worlds that have a strong canon as well (Forgotten Realms, we’re looking at you…)

Finally, check out the 2e Monstrous Manual Online that someone on Twitter pointed to this week. And yes, the Flumph is there!

Blast From The Past (Weekly Roundup: DDXP 2011 Edition)

The Labyrinth had a great article about the process they used to find a new player for their game.  While their success rate varied, you might find a resource here that you haven’t used yet.  Or you might just find the story of them trying to find a new player entertaining.
(1/30/11)

Weekly Roundup: Dice Tower Winner Edition

A couple of weeks ago, we announced a contest to give away a dice tower. Aaaaaand the winner is…… Benesky! Congrats! I’ll be contacting you shortly. On to the articles!

Extended Rest recounted a Thanksgiving Gamma World adventure he put together on the fly. We love flying by the seat of our pants, we love Gamma World, we love random tables, and heck, we love Thanksgiving too. So I guess this was bound to be roundup material.

Over at Rule of the Dice, they posted a rundown of the goods and bads of playing by blog (and how it’s different from playing by fourm). If you’re looking for an online play by post game, this is worth a read to understand the ins and outs.

There was an excellent discussion at Strange Magic about how elves aren’t just people with pointy ears, and how we can possibly roleplay in ways to set them apart from humans. This reminded us of discussion at the Gencon monster design seminar where the panelists were talking about “science fiction morality” and how “orcs AREN’T people too!”

If you’re looking for reviews of Heroes of the Feywild, we’ve got you covered. You can either check out the review over at NewbieDM, or read the review posted on Enworld by Neuroglyph Games.

Campaign Mastery posted a discussion of different types of plot structuring. This is worth a read, especially if you’re in the planning stages of a campaign. Also, check out the list of past articles on the topic at the end.

Finally, in cast you missed it, The ID DM posted a frakking THESIS, complete with research, graphs, and tables on the power creep he sees in 4e. Set aside some time for this one. Very well thought out.

Blast from the past (Weekly Roundup – Thanksgiving Edition)

Jared Von Hindman over at Wizards of the Coast wrote a highly entertaining and thought-provoking article about a town’s economy and motivations when adventurers show up.  There are some great ideas there for a “looks like a regular adventure, but looks can be deceiving” type adventure.  Just read it, you’ll see what I mean.

Weekly Roundup – Thanksgiving Edition

Thanksgiving weekend is one of the best times of the year for gaming.  Hopefully, you got a few tables together over the long weekend.  Go change into some sweatpants (because if you’re anything like us, you ate too much), and cozy up to this week’s best D&D articles.

Matt Sernett gave us his take on leveling up, and what happens when you adventure outside the “sweet spot.”  Good food for thought, not just for D&D, but for any game that has a leveling mechanic.

Jared Von Hindman over at Wizards of the Coast wrote a highly entertaining and thought-provoking article on the economy and motivations of a town when adventurers show up.  There are some great ideas in there for a “looks like a regular adventure, but looks can be deceiving” type adventure.  Just read it, you’ll see what I mean.

Campaign Mastery showed us how to come up with NPC stats on the fly, depending upon whether we want someone who is a challenge to the PCs or not.  Interesting; seems like a lot of prep work, and we’d have set up the spreadsheet to calculate the high, low, and average stats automatically.  But overall, not a bad idea.

Finally, we were excited to see Dungeon’s Master announce a new feature on their blog: “The Book Report.”  In it, they post fantasy books they’ve been reading with a rating.  If you’re looking for even more reading suggestions, you can also check out the “Fantasy Books We Like” section of our store.   Just click the “Store” tab on the menu bar up top there, and the categories will be in the left pane.  Keep an eye on that section because we’ll be constantly adding to it as we find more books we like!

Want a free plug for your own D&D blog?  Leave it in the comments!  Seriously, we want you to!