Tag Archives: Daily Encounter

Weekly Roundup: CONCurrent Edition

Perhaps you’re not going to GenCon. Perhaps you’re upset about that, and would still like to do some gaming that weekend. Have no fear – CONCurrent is an online gaming con that runs parallel to GenCon. You can check out their offerings here. There’s already a bunch of stuff listed to play, and there’s sure to be more as the event draws near. Is it the same as GenCon? Of course not. Is it a great alternative if you can’t make it to GenCon? Absolutely. Check it out, make some new friends, and learn some new games.

We don’t usually post articles from earlier than the previous week, but we have been known to make exceptions. Last week, we somehow missed this awesome roundup of all sorts of gaming aids over at Going Last. This is one you need to bookmark as a resource.

Don’t know if you’ve heard about this or not, but there’s a new, free, D&D-ish RPG out there called Heroes Against Darkness. It’s worth a look, if only for its price tag. Check out what Neuroglyph Games thought of it too.

Daily Encounter brought a little Greyhawk flavor into the Netheril 4e setting by designing a new secret society, and related theme. It’s part of the “Classics Return” blog carnival. (They’re accepting submissions until Aug 14, so if you have an RPG blog, get on that!)

Stuffer Shack recently ran a “Best Worst Villain” contest. We tried to choose one or two for the roundup, but we couldn’t. There are TONS of great ideas for villains here, so check out the list of all their entries.

The Welsh Piper has a great random table this week for creating religious orders. Perhaps they’ll figure prominently in your campaign, or perhaps the PCs stumbled across one. Either way, the article is a great primer, and the table is a quick way to generate one.

Big Ball of No Fun gives us some good ideas for making an NPC memorable, even when the PCs aren’t interacting directly with them. Keeping key NPCs in the forefront of the players mind is a great trick.

Finally, have you been wondering about Dungeon Command? Check out the review over at Breakfast for Owlbears. It makes us want to give it a try…

Blast From The Past (Weekly Roundup: 2011 GenCon Schedule Edition)

Dice Monkey started a new series hacking Gamma World into traditional D&D. Also note the link in the article to Chaos Grenade, who is doing something similar.

 

Weekly Roundup: Departing Player Edition

Today is the last day of play for one of my players. He’s moving on to bigger and better things, but he will be missed. He wrote up a nice epilogue for his player, and in it, he left me some huge hooks to make him a new villan in the campaign. Compelling, isn’t it, when one of the heroes turns to the dark side? How have you dealt with players leaving the campaign?

 Daily Encounter presented Goons as a new type of monster this week. They’re low HP monsters whose stat block can be written in one line.

This week on the Jennisodes podcast, the host interviewed Rob Donoghue of Evil Hat Productions and Some Space to Think. This is a great interview that runs the gamut of what projects he’s working on to his hopes for D&D Next.

DMG P. 42 presented a new way of calculating monster damage by extrapolating the damage that monsters do at first level as a percentage of average character hit points. Check out the article, and use the table for whenever you want to do brutal damage (or just all the time).

Monsters and Manuals presented some ideas for using the RPG Microscope to create a dungeon. While campaign worldbuilding applications for Microscope are obvious, applying it to a dungeon is certainly innovative.

When magic is widespread in a campaign world, what does the government do to regulate it? Troll in the Corner asked the question this week. Here’s a short piece of fiction and, at the bottom, some good questions to ask of your campaign.

Finally, if you’re looking to inject some conspiracy into your game, check out Exohuman. The stories are all modern, but with a little work, there are some great seeds there for a fantasy campaign!

Blast From The Past (Weekly Roundup: Still No Legion of Gold Edition)

Some Space to Think had two good articles this week, one on why you should be unfair to your players (sometimes), and a second clarifying what the author meant by “unfair.”  Thought provoking, and worthy of a read.
(2/27/11)

Weekly Roundup: D&D 5th Ed. Edition

Well, it’s been a crazy week for D&D – in case you’ve been living in a cave, or maybe just out of town with no internet, D&D 5th Edition blew up the internet on Monday. Don’t worry, we’ll still be blogging through it all, and when the new edition comes out, we fully intend to switch, and continue blogging about 5th edition.

Rather than try and round up all the links I came across about 5th edition, I’m going to link you to Stormin’ Da Castle, who has been doing a great job keeping up with all the different bloggers who have been writing. The list is long, and it seems like every article linked in his roundup comes at the subject from a different angle. Be sure to click as many of them as you can. It will give you a really good idea of where the blogosphere is at. Plus, there are some roundups linked from his roundup, not the least of which is the ENWorld one. Definitely check out ENWorld. Below, I’ve added a few that he missed, plus a couple of non-“D&D Next” articles I came across last week. Continue reading

Weekly Roundup: Happy 2012 Edition

Well, it’s happened again. You’ve wasted another perfectly good year reading D&D blogs. As we head into 2012, and our second full year of blogging, we hope to keep bringing you great weekly roundups, lots of arts and crafts, and plot hooks and DM advice you can use. Oh, and the podcast, of course.

If you missed the Got Loot blogfest hosted by Daily Encounter you should definitely check it out. Our contribution was on Thursday, but other blogs were contributing all week, including some guest posts at the host blog.

The Escapist had a great 3 part series on the past, present, and future of D&D. There are lots of great points and thoughts in the articles, some made by staff at WotC. Also, here are some followup thoughts at ENWorld by one of the articles’ contributors.

Robert Schwalb wrote an article this week after a blogging hiatus. It involves his thoughts on skill challenges in 4e – their origins, and his thoughts on them as one of 4e’s designers.

Need something to read over the holiday? Download the 107 page 2011 compilation of Chris Perkins’ WotC colum, The Dungeon Master Experience.

Need a little Gamma World inspiration? Check out this animated short at Ain’t It Cool News. This is definitely something we’d like to see as a feature length film!

Arts and Crafts! Oh how we love them! Check out The Armchair General who is doing some pretty cool stuff with foam insulation board and textured paint. Genius!

Finally, there was the story of the Lakers coach who plays D&D with his son. You can find that article here.

Blast From The Past (Weekly Roundup: 2010 In Review Edition)

We’ll just link the entire Weekly Roundup because it’s a review of some of our favorite articles from 2010. Great list, it’s nice to browse blog archives sometimes; it’s not like the advice gets stale!

Weekly Roundup: Coming Up On 200 Edition

It’s crazy for us to think, but it seems as though we’re coming up on 200 posts. This one is 198 – it seems like just yesterday we were celebrating 100 – unfortunately, we won’t be doing a giveaway for 200 since we just did a giveaway for our 1 year anniversary. Hopefully, by pointing you to some articles we can distract you from that, and deflect some of the nerd rage.

Arcane Springboard had a great analysis of the “Peak/End” rule and how it applies to a gaming session and even a campaign. Check it out at This Is My Game.

If you’re looking for a design challenge this week, check out A Walk In The Dark. A treasure vault has been presented, and there’s a contest to populate it!

Daily Encounter has announced a new blog carnival. If you recall, we participated in “Winter is Coming” and “A Night In The Lonesome October,” and will be participating in this one as well. They also posted a great article this week by guest author @DigitalDraco entitled “Back to Basics.”

Initiative or What? had some ideas to “automate” monsters. Make some general action “bundles” and roll a die to see what they do. Check out the specifics, and weigh in on how you would use it.

Gamer Assembly had some general thoughts about 4e. Head on over there and weigh in with your own opinions. They’re a new blog, so show them some love!

Rules as UNwritten had some great ideas for challenging players at upper paragon and epic.

We’re not sure how we missed this one, but friends of the podcast Dice of Doom have been developing their own RPG entitled Goblins! Considering the fact that they’ve been sampling an RPG a month for over a year now, we expect the game to be very well thought out. And if there’s a Kickstarter for it, we’ll be sure to post it in the sidebar there.

If you’re looking for a free holiday-themed adventure that doesn’t include a “jolly old elf,” look no further than Skyland Games’ take on “A Christmas Carol.” Instead of taking a break over the holidays, break out the eggnog and dice!

Finally, The RPG Doctor had a great post this week on how to teach D&D in a one-on-one setting. We’ve been thinking a lot recently about one-on-one D&D with experienced players, so this was a great new angle.

Blast From The Past (Weekly Roundup: Big Excel Project)

NewbieDM gave his take on what a 1 player campaign might look like.  While it’s mostly conjecture at this point, we hope he actually tries some of his ideas, and shares that too.

Weekly Roundup: Play A New RPG Month Is Underway Edition

 Well, it’s October, so that means that Play A New RPG Month is in full swing. Hopefully, you’ve been branching out with your group and trying something new. Be sure to check out the site, and weigh in on what you’ve been playing so that the moderators can keep track of all the participants. The link is in the sidebar there, or you can just click here.

The She DM posted a super easy to make, and really good looking set of tentacle miniatures. We love stuff like this.

If you liked all the contributions to the Winter is Coming blog carnival, you should definitely check out the carnival being hosted by A Man’s Brain Attic. Titled “A Night in the Lonesome October,” this one will be (predictably) horror/Halloween themed. If you’re a blogger, participate! If you’re not, keep an eye out for all the submissions.

 Daily Encounter proposed a new feat, and a whole pile of new cantrips that are full of flavor. Add them to your game, and see what your players do with them!

The ID DM discussed how to use scarcity to add tension and engagement in your game. As they always say… less is more.

If you remember a month or so ago, we highlighted the “adventure a day” challenge over at Asshat Paladins. The challenge is over, and you can check out a list of every single adventure idea posted. It’s quite a list, and would keep any DM busy for quite a while. (You’ll have to click through the links to specific blogs – they haven’t been compiled in a document, nor do I suspect they will be)

IntWisCha posted a short article on how to reconcile plot and mechanics when the two conspire against you.

Finally, Initiative or What posted an automated treasure generator. Free to download, all you need is Excel. Awesome!

Weekly Roundup: One Last Winter is Coming Link Edition

We really had fun writing for the Winter is Coming blog carnival this week.  It was nice to have a focused theme to write on.  But we feel bad that everything we wrote was for the DMs.  So, for all the players out there, here’s one last bit for the Winter is Coming blog carnival.  It’s a link for players who want to add a cold theme to your character. We like to call it “Frost Cheese” around here, because it’s just that good.  You can hear Hamblin discuss it on Episode 4 of Level Up, our player focused podcast. (Also, if you missed yesterday’s post, here is a PDF of all the Winter is Coming stat blocks we did this week)

If you’d like to read all the Winter is Coming articles over at Wombat’s Gaming Den of Iniquity, this is your starting point.

The Fearless DM had a bone to pick this week with LFR writers, and how skill challenges are written for LFR modules.  While we would have liked to see a solution to the problem, we do agree that sometimes LFR skill challenges can be needlessly complicated.

There was a lot of talk on Twitter this week about the recent Legends & Lore articles addressing skills in the D&D system(s).  Sarah Darkmagic posted several articles exploring her thoughts on the 4e skill system, starting with this one. (Of course, we recommend all three).  Daily Encounter also weighed in with their thoughts.

At Critical Hits Dixon explored his struggle to design and perfect the one page character sheet.  We too have tried the one page sheet, though ours is double sided.  Not sure if that’s cheating or not…

Stuffer Shack promised to multiply your game’s fun by ten by adding a simple house rule.

Neuroglyph Games gave us three reasons to give Fortune Cards a shot. We’ve gone back and forth a few times on whether they should be used, but we’re definitely leaning towards, “go for it, they’re lots of fun.”

Finally, we thought we’d remind you about the Dungeons A-Z series going on at Ben’s RPG Pile.

That’s it for this week! Let us know what you thought of the Winter is Coming blog carnival!

Weekly Roundup: 2011 Ennie Nominations Edition

Well, the Ennie nominations were announced this week.  You can check them out here; perhaps you’ll see some names, products, and blogs you recognize. And no, we don’t mean this blog.  But it is good to see our fellow bloggers getting recognition, and some for things that aren’t even blogging!  Speaking of fellow bloggers…

At Daily Encounter this week, Obsidian Crane pondered the criteria for labeling a D&D adventure as a “classic.”  Lots of good points here, and definitely worth a read.

Blood, Sweat, and Dice talked about the positive effects of nixing the Raise Dead ritual.  We like the idea of making death a final event in a character’s life.  Sometimes it feels like raise dead is too… easy.

Leonine Roar wrote a basic primer on ways to increase an encounter’s challenge and damage.  While this may or may not be information you’ve read elsewhere, a reminder is always good.

Stuffer Shack listed the 50 things about D&D you won’t find in the books.  We found ourselves chuckling and nodding our heads at most of them.  True… so true…

Finally, if you missed the cute story about the little girl who interrupted her dad’s D&D game, and the ensuing hilarity, you can read about it on the WotC forums here.

What great article did we miss this week?  Leave it in the comments!

 

Weekly Roundup: Secret Project Revealed Edition

Recently, I hinted at a “secret” project I’ve been working on.  Well, time to pull back the curtain.  I have been building 3D models of the Fourthcore Deathmatch maps for GenCon.  The first two maps are done, and I’ve posted pictures here – I put them in a separate article because there are too many for a weekly roundup.  The third map is secret, so I won’t be posting any pics of that model.  Check them out (next article), or if you’ll be at GenCon, come see them in person!  The models will be for sale at GenCon after the Deathmatch, and any models not sold at the end of the con will go up on Ebay.  I’ll announce that here if I end up auctioning them.  Now, on to some articles…

Geneome showed us how he made the Ritual Tower from the Dark Sun adventure “Revenge of the Marauders.”  This is as simple and inexpensive as a project can get, and it still looks great!

Spinoff Online wondered if Hollywood is over its love affair with geek culture.  While not a D&D specific article, it’s still a good read.

Arcane Springboard conjectured about the future of D&D over at This Is My Game.  Is D&D close to 5th edition, or is 4th edition simply expanding further?  Time will tell.

Daily Encounter gave us a free multi-part skill challenge.  In it, PCs need to evacuate a town before the adjacent river overflows its banks.  Success is measured in how many villagers are killed in the natural disaster.  Check this one out!

Finally, The D&Dverse was rocked on Tuesday, as Save Versus Death announced that he will no longer be working on Fourthcore, then followed up with this explanation.  We hope to see Fourthcore live on, however, as fans continue to develop within this subgenre of D&D (and we believe he has this hope as well).

Don’t forget to check out the Deathmatch model pics – next article down!