Tag Archives: Dread Gazebo

Weekly Roundup: Tyranny Tile Time Lapse Edition

A couple of weeks ago, I posted pictures of the Tyranny of Goblins Hirst Arts tiles I made. I decided to make a time lapse video while I was making the “Temple” tile, but hadn’t had a chance to compile it until this week. You can see me putting a tile together from start to finish (minus painting and basing) in about 5 minutes:


 

If you’d like to see more time lapse stuff from me, let me know what you’d like to see in the comments below!

Over at Chameleon this week, we have some tips on game prep. It’s always good to see different perspectives.

The Midgard campaign setting continues to make waves. i09 had a spotlight this week, and Tabletop Gamer had an interview.

If you’ve always played PCs and NPCs as good or evil, and want to add some more gray to your campaign, check out the morally ambiguous character backgrounds at Dread Gazebo this week. For D&D Next.

Temple of Demogorgon wonders if he’s disenchanted with dungeons as an adventure setting because he’s a grown up now.

At Kobold Quarterly we have a new look at what “Post Apocalypse” really means.

Dyson’s Dodecahedron is posting new maps again. Someone do something cool with this!

Finally, Neuroglyph Games gave us some ideas for level draining.

Blast From The Past (Weekly Roundup: Shameless Plea For Votes Edition)

Some Space to Think had an excellent article analyzing why you don’t see enough role playing in your game. You may be surprised at the answer.

Weekly Roundup: Columbus Day Edition

Tomorrow is Columbus Day. A day when we celebrate exploration and risk taking in the name of adventure, treasure, and discovery – so a great holiday for D&Ders to celebrate, even if you’re not from America. Oh, and if you have the day off, enjoy that too.

This week, Thoughtcrime Games had a very thought-provoking post on the role of story in your RPG game. How do we prepare story before the game? The answer may surprise you.

Coincidentally, The Alexandrian had an anecdote from this week as well that illustrates the Thoughtcrime Games article perfectly. Might be time to reevaluate your idea of story in RPGs…

DMG 42 started a series this week on a Megadungeon campaign he’s running. We stole some inspiration from him for our summer campaign this year, so we’ll be watching this series with interest.

Froths of 4e introduced a way to allow the creation of new magic spells through “spell research.” With the way 4e gives special powers to every class, we don’t see why this wouldn’t work for other classes too, just call it something different (e.g. “Martial Training”)

If you’re looking to try a new RPG, we were intrigued by the GM-less “Committee For The Exploration Of Mysteries” presented at This Is My Game this week. At the very least, good for a couple of one shots.

If you follow The Chatty DM on Twitter, you may have noticed that he traveled to France recently. Getting out of your day to day routine is a great way to find new plot inspirations; here are a two that he got on his travels over at Critical Hits.

On the arts & crafts front, check out Dread Gazebo‘s tutorial on making your own portable wargaming table for a couple of bucks.

Big Ball Of No Fun asks if character death and lethality are myths in all editions of the game, not just the newer ones.

Reality Refracted takes a look at the social contract around the gaming table – which tenets do you play by?

Finally, if you’re looking for something to listen to instead of read, or if you’re looking for advice on submitting pitches to Dungeon and Dragon, check out The Tome Show this week.

Blast From The Past (Weekly Roundup: Winter Is Coming Edition)

First up, if you’re looking for story ideas, check out the link posted by Risus TOTM this week. It’s a story idea generator over at the TV Tropes site. (If nothing else, this is a great way to waste even MORE time at the TV Tropes site…)

Weekly Roundup: Ennies Voting Is Open Edition

Voting for the Ennies is only open for the next week, so head on over there and vote (the link opens in a new window so you can let it sit while you peruse the roundup). Befoe you head over there though, we want to note this, which is in the voting instructions: Before voting, please take the time to familiarize yourself with the products. The product titles link to their publisher’s websites, allowing you to learn more about that product. The Ennies are not a popularity contest. Don’t vote for something just because it was made by a publisher you like, even if you haven’t seen the actual product. Take a little bit of time to get to know all the products in a category, or don’t vote in that category at all. Let’s make this the best Ennies ever!

This week, The She DM wrote up a great analysis of how much the new WotC Dungeon Command game costs vs. how much you’d pay on the secondary market for the same miniatures. If you’re just going to buy Dungeon Command for the miniatures, this article is a must read.

Reality Refracted has some great advice for long time GMs who make the switch to the other side of the screen. Sometimes it’s difficult to go from GM to player, and this is some great advice for those who change up their role.

Campaign Mastery wrote a very in-depth article on investigative adventures, and the different ways to lead PCs from Mystery to Solution. This is a long one folks, so set some time aside, but definitely worth a read if you’re thinking about this type of adventure in the near future. (We also have some advice from a while back…)

If you’re looking for something more bite-sized, check out the quick paragraph that Joe the Lawyer wrote about what makes for the best D&D groups.

If you have little ones, and love Gencon, make sure you check out Dread Gazebo‘s article on bringing kids to Gencon. Of course, every child is different, but the advice here is solid. (We might also note that this article goes hand in hand with the one by Avy Valentine which was linked last week.)

Sly Flourish posted some great advice on how to tie PCs to a prepublished adventure. For many DMs, the inability to fit something prepublished into their campaign keeps them from using prepublished resources. Try some of these tricks to personalize prepublished adventures.

Finally, you may have heard about the new RPG coming out called 13th Age. And you may have some questions. If so, check out the 13 facts about 13th Age posted this week at their site. Looks like a fun system.

Blast From The Past (Weekly Roundup: Loot! Edition)

A Character For Every Game [now Dyson’s Dodecahedron] posted a roundup of maps from around the blogosphere.  If you’re as into maps as he is, check it out.  It’s a great source of bloggers who regularly post maps to steal.  We love a good roundup!

Weekly Roundup: Dungeonmorph Dice Have Arrived Edition

Well, it’s been several months, but the Dungeonmorph Dice from the Kickstarter we supported have arrived. We were very happy with them, and thought we’d do a short video blog to show them off:

Skyland Games did a review of the dice too, which you can check out here. They got the font, so there’s also an example of that in their review.

Over at The Dungeon’s Master they’re re-posting their best articles for 2011 until the end of the year. If you don’t get a chance to read all their stuff, this might be a good time to check out what their “Greatest Hits” were over the past year.

 If you’re in the mood for some Gamma World fare, A Walk In The Dark has just the thing. He posted a piece of an adventure he wrote but did not publish – this piece is called Gammacore Reactor, and it looks pretty cool. 

Just yesterday, Ben’s RPG Pile wrapped up his A-Z blog series. Lots of good terrain and miniatures ideas in that series, so this is us encouraging you to check out all 26. Especially “F.” We’re really looking forward to the next series, which is hinted at the end of the linked article.

 Dread Gazebo posted an impromptu podcast that may or may not become a series. It’s basically him and his wife arguing about discussing various aspects of D&D. Highly entertaining, even if it only turns out to be a one shot. (And if you want our thoughts on the Bladesinger, check out our podcast tomorrow.)

At Critical Hits this week, The Chatty DM posted some great thoughts and ideas on how to improvise an entire game session. Since our DMing style leans towards pants-seat-flying, we thought this article was really fun to read. (We’ll be buying some glass beads today)

If you’re planning on a Christmas game, you should check out the seven ideas for Christmas themed adventures over at Game Knight Reviews.

Finally, on Twitter this week, someone posted this Google spreadsheet of all the Dungeon Magazine 4e adventures. Pretty cool, though I forget who is was… if it was you, drop a comment!!

Blast from the Past (Weekly Roundup: Imaginative Tactics Edition)

The Weem discussed alternate goals in combat.  You know, besides “kill all the monsters until they’re dead.”  Because killing everything all the time can get boring (contrary to popular belief).  Besides, it’s good to switch it up on your PCs from time to time.

 

Weekly Roundup: Reading A Night In The Lonesome October Edition

So, as you may know, we participated in the “A Night in the Lonesome October” blog carnival. What you may not know is that the carnival’s name is based upon a book. We decided to pick up the book from our local library, and have been enjoying it immensly. We’re not done yet, but from where we’re at, we’d recommend it to anyone who likes classic horror. With that, on to the articles…

Tabletop Wizard gave us the lowdown on the Call of Chuthulu RPG, which considering the time of month, plus the fact that it’s (still) Play a New RPG month, seemed appropriate to include.

Dread Gazebo has been going through a rough patch with his DMing and his group, and has been honest enough to share those struggles on his blog. Check out some of the lessons he learned.

Stuffer Shack had some great thoughts as to whether PVP in an RPG is kosher, or whether it’s bad form. Weigh in with your own thoughts in the comments their article.

If you’re looking for a quick read, Stormin Da Castle had some thoughts on the most recent Legends and Lore article. Should all the monsters from previous editions make their way into the later ones?

And congratulations to Newbie DM who was interviewed by the new CNN blog Geek Out! RPG Kids is sure making a name for itself!

Finally, this week was the Game Night Blog Carnival, so we thought we’d link to this awesome and thorough statistical analysis on getting more brains in Zombie Dice by One Gamer’s Opinion. A must read for owners of the game.

Current contests (that we’re aware of) include:

  • Goinglast.net – Win your face on a game card! Check the “News” section of the show notes, and listen to this podcast.
  • Newbie DM and Gator Games (this one ends at midnight tonight!!) – Giving away a copy of the DMG and DMG2
  • Obsidian Portal and D20 Monkey – Monthly Caption Contest
  • Also, these aren’t contests, but we thought we’d mention them anyway – 10% off print products at the Evil Hat website (until 10/31) and 25% off Dragon Chow dice bags (until 11/1 using the code CHOMPY). Looks like it’s time to try out some Dresden files and get our first Dragon Chow dice bag!

Blast from the past (Weekly Roundup – Spoooooky Edition)
Aaron over at Phelanar’s Den gave us the perfect “wishlist vs. random treasure” hybrid system for doling out the goodies to the trick or trea…. I mean the party.

 

Weekly Roundup: Totally Unrelated Link Edition

My wife is a food blogger.  She blogs about all the delicious food she makes for me and our family.  I have benefitted greatly from this new hobby of hers, as she is an incredible cook and the blogging only encourages her creativity in the kitchen.  Just like RPG bloggers follow other RPG blogs, my wife follows a lot of food blogs.  Just this last week, she found My Drunk Kitchen, a “food” video blog (you’ll have to watch the videos to see why I put food in quotation marks).  While the videos posted there may not be everyone’s speed, my wife and I find them to be quite hilarious.  Check them out. (As a disclaimer, the host does, in fact, get drunk in every episode, and also uses some “colorful” language from time to time).  And that is your totally unrelated link, as the title suggests.  On to some more appropriate articles….

This week Wizards of the Coast posted a press release, announcing that they had resolved  some rights issues with Atari.  It also announces a delay in the new Neverwinter video game until “late 2012.”

Over at Wired, Geek Dad posted an article on simplifing D&D for kids – don’t miss the PDF at the end of the article for the rules to “DnD-ish.”

The Angry DM posted another article, this time attempting to define “role playing.”  He makes a thought-provoking distinction between “acting” and “roleplaying,” making this one a must read.

Roleplaying Tips blogged about how to get your players to hand you Checkov’s Gun.  If you don’t know what Checkov’s Gun is, you can check out TV Tropes.  Do so at your own peril (and only if you have several hours at your disposal).

Dread Gazebo reviewed the next-to-newest D&D boardgame this week, Conquest of Nerath.  He also included this video on how to play the game, released by Wizards of the Coast this week.

Short list of articles this week, mostly because I don’t expect anyone to remember to come back after they wander over to My Drunk Kitchen and TVTropes.org.

Weekly Roundup: (Mostly) Post Gencon Wrapup Edition

We’re back from Gencon! Check out tomorrow’s podcast for Benoit’s thoughts and experiences (among other things).  Until then, here’s some Gencon goodness in the Weekly Roundup (plus some other stuff).

First, we’ll do a quick roundup of bloggers that blogged about their experiences at Gencon this week:

Also, we would be remiss if we did not provide a link to the Ennie winners (click through to the pdf).  Congratulations to everyone who won!

Finally, Critical Hits did a great summary of the Wizards of the Coast New Products seminar.  If you want to know what’s in the pipeline over at WotC, check it out. Also, Alphastream included a few links on his blog to followup information on the new products, as well as his thoughts.

And then some non-Gencon articles we noticed:

Every DM knows that inspiration for their campaign is all around us.  From paintings, to literature, to actual history.  If you’re looking for historical inspiration, check out Illuminerdy‘s primer on the ancient Mexican city of Chichen Itza, complete with campaign and plot hook ideas.

Heroes of Shadow posted a brief overview and review of the Neverwinter Fortune cards.  We’ll be discussing them in tomorrow’s podcast as well, so tune in for that.

At-Will wrote about why it’s hard to make hard encounters.

Finally, where current events and gaming meet, we find this story about some London looters and a Games Workshop store. (Edit: We’re not sure if this story is for real)

Whose Gencon wrapup did we miss?  Link it in the comments!

Weekly Roundup: How We Find Our Articles Edition

We’ve been doing a weekly roundup for over six months now.  Some of you may be wondering, how do they find the blog articles for the Roving Band of Misfit’s Weekly Roundup?  Or maybe not.  Either way, we’re going to tell you.  There are several sources we have for articles:

  1. Twitter.  If someone we follow Tweets an interesting article, we give it a look.
  2. 4eblogs.com.  There’s no archive on this site, so if we don’t notice something in the first few days, we generally don’t notice it.  Also, the list of contributors to that site is short, and we like to keep the articles diverse.  So we don’t lean too heavily there.
  3. RPGbloggers.com.  As to the number of contributors, completely the opposite of 4eblogs.  Sometimes a single day’s worth of blog posts goes on for a few pages.  As to the amount of posts we have to sift through to find an interesting, relevant article… also the opposite.  We generally scan the headlines, and if something grabs our interest, we’ll read the article.  Since this site does have an archive, we can go back over the week’s blog postings at our leisure.

Next time, we’ll discuss how we pick articles, and what causes something to catch our eye.  But for now, some articles!

Paul from Blog of Holding posted an amazing graphic depicting all the monsters in MM1 by level and environment.  We can’t imagine how much time this took…

Dread Gazebo posted a homebrew skill specialization system for 4e that we really like.  Be sure to give him feedback (positive or negative) so he can refine the rules.

Every month, Wastex Games has been hosting a contest on their blog.  For May, the contest was “Tribes of the Land” where entrants were challenged to come up with a unique tribe of monsters.  We especially liked Wes Hall’s entry, which was presented this week: The Stone Raiders, a tribe of Cockatrice riding Goblins.  No, you read that right.

Trollish Delver had some interesting thoughts on why we may gravitate towards lower level characters.  You should weigh in on how you feel, as his musings are largely open-ended.  We’re especially interested in what The ID DM has to say, from a psychology standpoint… (As an aside, there’s a mention in the article of the Dungeon Crawl Classics; for more on that check out this article from Beyond the Black Gate)

Big Ball of No Fun posted a great way to get quick and easy building floorplans on the fly.  Just another reason to have a computer handy when you play.  (Don’t tell me that my players are the only ones who go off script and wander into random buildings….)

Finally, remember that episode of Community everyone was talking about a few months back?  The one where the cast plays D&D for the entire episode?  The A.V. Club posted an interview with Dan Harmon (Community’s creator) this week where he comments on the making of the episode.  You have to scroll down a bit; look for the picture of Chevy Chase holding the D&D adventure.

What cool articles did we miss this week?

Weekly Roundup – Dungeon Geomorph Dice Edition

This week, we found the Dungeon Geomorph Dice project on Kickstarter.  We were so excited, we threw $40 in the pot for two sets of dice (and crossed our fingers for the second “caverns” set).  Here’s why you should, too: we will be developing some free supplements to these dice for you to use.  Just to be clear, we’re not affiliated with this project in any way; we just think they’re really cool, and wanted to try and make them as useful as possible.  We won’t start working on this project until we have the dice in hand and see what kind of supplements have been shipped with them.  The stuff we develop will be completely 4e compatible.  Spread the word by using the Facebook, Twitter, and other icons at the end of this post!

On to the articles…

The Labyrinth had an interesting discussion on generating ability scores based upon percentiles instead of 4d6.  The most intriguing part of his system was the racial adjustments of probabilites for each stat.

Then there was Dread Gazebo (with his fancy new blog layout!) who encouraged DMs to abandon the XP budget.  This, of course, sparked some debate, and Sarah Darkmagic weighed in with a counterpoint.

Did we mention there’s a contest to win Heroes of Shadow over at A Walk in the Dark? Yup.  Go check it out if you want to win it.

On the podcast side of things, we urge you to check out the Going Last podcast.  There’s lots of miniatures talk, and non-D&D “general gaming” talk as well, so if you’re into that sort of thing, give it a listen.

Finally, The Rhetorical Gamer talked about what 4e got wrong, in his opinion.  And, to be fair, last week he also wrote about what it got right.  Check it out, and see if you agree.

Who are we missing?  Anyone?  Anyone?

Weekly Roundup – The Weekly Roundup is Moving! Edition

So, our experiment with podcasting has been successful, and is going to become a regular fixture on the site.  Since we record and post the podcast on Sunday, we’ve decided to move the Weekly Roundup to Saturdays starting this coming Saturday.  Now you have something to do while you drink your Saturday morning coffee!  You can thank us in the comments.  After you read these articles.

Dread Gazebo had a great article this week on running horror in your games.  There was plenty of advice, including “All show is no show,” meaning the DM should keep information close to the chest.

If you’re looking for a budget solution to condition markers, look no further than This Is My Game‘s post this week.  Geek Ken put together a freebie, and they look really nice!

RPG Musings gave us food for thought when they proposed the idea of short campaigns.  The advantage being, of course, closure for all involved.  A good idea for those who have never really had any because the group just sort of broke up for some reason.

 If you want to take your Gamma World game from levels 11-20, you need to check out Dazed, Save Ends‘s column this week on “Uber Tier.”  Monsters are no problem either, as just about any D&D monster fits in a Gamma World setting.

Finally, Alphastream weighed in on the “speed of combat” issue on his Wizards of the Coast blog.  He argues that 4e is far too engaging even when it’s not your turn to complain about how long the combats take.  Guess it’s time to open up the discussion again… leave him a comment!

This Saturday! Don’t forget!