Tag Archives: ENWorld

Weekly Roundup: Tweet RPG Edition

If you’re one of those people who sometimes wonder what Twitter is “for,” then perhaps this is right up your alley – it’s an RPG game that is being run on Twitter for whomever wishes to take part. It’s called Tweet RPG, and players collectively control a single character by following the story and voting on next actions. Catch up on the story, get a Twitter account, and dive in! And while you’re at it, follow us on Twitter too…

Over at Blog of Holding, there was an article about some designers’ comments trying to allay fears about 2nd edition D&D. Some sounds familiar; be sure to read the comments as well for a good dialogue. It’s also interesting to note that we saw a lot of the same fan comments in the magazines when D&D moved to 3rd edition.

At his WotC blog, Jester talks about what the playtest process is. This is a good companion article to the one we linked to at Greywulf’s Lair a few weeks ago.

Geek Native had a cool infographic this week about the history of dice. It includes a d20 from Roman times, a d12 from Egyptian times, as well as lots of other dice related archaeological finds.

There was a great post at ENWorld this week about how to run a great convention game. With “Con Season” coming up, this post couldn’t be more timely.

Frivology tackled the thorny subject of sexism in gaming. While this subject has tons of diverse viewpoints, it’s always interesting to hear a female’s point of view (especially in a hobby dominated by males).

Finally, speaking of ladies in the hobby, over at Character Generation Liz waxes philosophical about not feeling “geek enough.”

Blast From The Past (Weekly Roundup: 100th Post Giveaway Edition)

Over at his own blog, Geek Ken asked an important question that deserves an answer: Where is the WotC support for Gamma World? 

Weekly Roundup: Site of the Year Voting Edition

As you may or may not know, Stuffer Shack has an “RPG Site of the Year” contest every year. As their site of the month for last September, Roving Band of Misfits was automatically entered into the contest. Without going into too much detail, you’ll be able to vote for our site on Thursday of this week, and we encourage you to do so! (Don’t worry, we’ll remind you again)

If you missed the D&D Next seminar at PAX East last week, you can catch the whole thing over at ENWorld. This is a must see if you want the most up to date info from the designers themselves.

Blog of Holding had some deep thoughts about monsters this week – what kinds of traces do the monsters leave behind? What kinds of clues would they leave? Not only does “Monster Traces” lend a sense of realism to the campaign, but it also can create mystery, or even a sense of dread for the players.

Looking for an interesting encounter this week? Check out the D&D burglar alarm encounter presented by Breakfast for Owlbears.

Thoughtcrime Games posted some thoughts on motivations for characters that extend beyond mere survival. Good thoughts, especially when we realize that our days are filled with more motivation than “survival instinct.” What drives your character?

Of course, we can never let a good arts & crafts article go by without adding it to the roundup. This week, The She DM added even more tentacles to your box of minis. (You may remember the article we did a while back that added onto her original tentacle article)

Finally, some thoughts from Critical Hits on the different kinds of mapping that exists in D&D combat – gridded, theater of the imagination, and more. What are the pros and cons?

Blast From The Past (Weekly Roundup: Changes to the Podcast Edition)

Neuroglyph Games had a thought-provoking article on character optimization.  Agree or disagree?  Leave them a comment!  (We do see his point, though we wish he would have also addressed living campaigns)

Weekly Roundup: New Homebrew Campaign Edition

This coming weekend, our group is going to be starting a new 4e homebrew campaign. A little Greyhawk, and a little special ops, we’re pretty excited to get going on it. If you want to hear more, stay tuned for our next podcast, hopefully going up sometime this week.

Kobold Quarterly posted its first article by WotC alum Steve Winter this week. He talks about lethality in D&D, and whether you should expect your character to survive until level 30. If you want more of Steve’s musings, he has his own blog at Howling Tower.

About a month ago, we posted an article on making an interesting solo in 10 seconds. Extended Rest tried the technique and blogged about it. See how it turned out!

If you’ve ever played one of those old school “text adventure” computer games, you’ll enjoy the Exits Are project. While not an RPG, per se, it’s very RPG-ish, and very cool.

Blog of Holding wrapped up its series “Playing D&D With Mike Mornard.” Check out all seven parts, they’re all good. (Mike Mornard played in Gary Gygax’s D&D game, as well as Dave Arneson’s)

What do you do when a party goal could be accomplished most easily by a single character? The Dungeon’s Master tackled the question this week.

If you’ve played Revenge of the Iron Lich, be sure to head over to Save vs. Death to leave your first impressions and memories. RotIL turned 1 this week!

Finally, check out the new animated webseries from ENWorld called “The Perturbed Dragon.” The prologue is currently up for your viewing pleasure.

Blast From The Past (Weekly Roundup: Who Wins The Free Book Edition)

The Hopeless Gamer had an amazing guest post detailing how to make a ravine for your miniature game terrain.  Say it with me: Arts…..And…..Crafts!!!

Weekly Roundup: Out of Town Encounters Edition

This past Wednesday, I was out of town on business. Not wanting to sit around in my hotel room, I decided to find a local D&D Encounters group to play with. Where I ended up was Showcase Comics and Games at the Granite Run Mall in Media, PA. I wanted to give a big shout out to that group because they couldn’t have been more welcoming to a “new” player. Thanks! I had a blast, and if I ever find myself in Philadelphia on a Wednesday night again, I’ll be sure to crash their party. As an aside, that’s one of the cool things about Encounters; I was able to jump right into the story with my character, even though I had never played with the group.

This week Sarah Darkmagic wrote an article on how skills have historically been presented in D&D, and what she hopes to see for them in D&D Next. (As an aside, I really hope WotC comes up with a name for the next edition soon)

Speaking of D&D Next (PLEASE announce a new name…) Obsidian Portal was at DDXP this year, and was allowed to post videos from a few of the seminars. You can find the Class Design seminar and the Future D&D Products seminar on their Vimeo site. You can also get some seminar transcripts at the ENWorld site.

Blood, Sweat, and Dice had a great article about 3D terrain. Be sure to check out the pictures of the cliff that helped him win the PAX East 2011 DM Challenge!

A Walk In The Dark went into more depth this week on the subject of attack math in 4e. This was a followup to the article we linked to in last week’s roundup by The Howling Tower. Check that one out first, if you didn’t last week.

Have you ever called the DM Hotline? Did you know that sometimes Chris Perkins answers questions? Check out this video of a couple of kids who called, and asked him some rules questions.

Stuffer Shack posted an article on where to find advice when you’re stuck. You know, besides Stuffer Shack.

Need to add some paranoia and conspiracy to your game? Look no further than Geek’s Dream Girl who delved into the topic this week. After all, not EVERYthing should be just as it seems…

Finally, there was a cool article on Fast Company this week about how Hasbro and other game companies are offering more and more of their games in digital form, as well as in a box.

Blast From The Past (Weekly Roundup: Halfhearted Edition)

Critical Hit‘s Logan Bonner took on the differences between magic items in 3e and 4e, and discussed whether he thought the changes were good, bad, or indifferent.  Considering the fact that he’s a designer over at WotC, and worked on the Adventuer’s Vault, this is a must read.
(1/23/11)

Weekly Roundup: Impending Scheduling Change Edition

In the next few weeks, I’ll be changing the article schedule on the site. For those of you who pay attention, you’ve noticed that I post articles on Tues/Thurs and the weekly roundup on Sunday. I’ll be moving the posting schedule to Wed/Fri; the weekly roundup will remain on Sunday. This is most likely a temporary change – Wed/Fri is more convenient for my life right now, but when things get back to normal, I’ll probably go back to Tues/Thurs. So if you show up one Tuesday, and there’s no article, well, that’s what happened.

Over at This Is My Game, DeadOrcs posted some great thoughts on using a wizard’s implement as a weapon. Depending upon what implement you use, you get to add a special rider to your attacks. Worth a look. (We also love the new site art for the articles!)

At ENWorld, site owner Morrus started a discussion on why he hopes the Forgotten Realms isn’t updated for D&D 5e. We certainly see his points (especially the comment about kitchen sinks), though coming at the argument from a perspective of “I don’t care about the Forgotten Realms, so you shouldn’t either” might not necessarily win people over. We would, however, like to see what Wizards could come up with for a brand new setting. Maybe another Eberron style contest?

We loved the article by Vanir over at Critical Hits this week. We too would love to see digital tools opened up to third parties to see what the community comes up with (even if a lot of the technical jargon went over our heads…).

With all the talk of the next edition of D&D, Bat in the Attic posted a list of all the versions of D&D. It’s basically just the list, but an interesting read nonetheless.

John Du Bois followed up on the article he wrote for us this week with an article on his own blog where he discusses the difference between a “judge” and a “DM.” For those not in the know, “judge” is the commonly used term for DMs who run adventures for living campaigns.

Howling Tower discussed the problem of illusory math on his site this week – that is, the escalation of monster AC that keeps pace with the party’s to-hit bonuses.

Way back in 2010, we wrote an article on ship combat. As a result, we’re always on the lookout for good ship combat mechanics, so we were happy to see Troll in the Corner post an article on just that topic this week.

Finally, in case you missed it this week, Wizards of the Coast announced that it will be re-releasing the first edition D&D core rulebooks. Keep an eye out for them starting in April!

Blast From The Past (Weekly Roundup: Finished Sea Maiden Edition)

Board Enterprises had some interesting thoughts about whether or not you should map out locations in your campaign.  While a definitive solution to the problem was not presented, it certainly gave us something to think about.
(1/16/11)