Tag Archives: Going Last

Weekly Roundup: CONCurrent Edition

Perhaps you’re not going to GenCon. Perhaps you’re upset about that, and would still like to do some gaming that weekend. Have no fear – CONCurrent is an online gaming con that runs parallel to GenCon. You can check out their offerings here. There’s already a bunch of stuff listed to play, and there’s sure to be more as the event draws near. Is it the same as GenCon? Of course not. Is it a great alternative if you can’t make it to GenCon? Absolutely. Check it out, make some new friends, and learn some new games.

We don’t usually post articles from earlier than the previous week, but we have been known to make exceptions. Last week, we somehow missed this awesome roundup of all sorts of gaming aids over at Going Last. This is one you need to bookmark as a resource.

Don’t know if you’ve heard about this or not, but there’s a new, free, D&D-ish RPG out there called Heroes Against Darkness. It’s worth a look, if only for its price tag. Check out what Neuroglyph Games thought of it too.

Daily Encounter brought a little Greyhawk flavor into the Netheril 4e setting by designing a new secret society, and related theme. It’s part of the “Classics Return” blog carnival. (They’re accepting submissions until Aug 14, so if you have an RPG blog, get on that!)

Stuffer Shack recently ran a “Best Worst Villain” contest. We tried to choose one or two for the roundup, but we couldn’t. There are TONS of great ideas for villains here, so check out the list of all their entries.

The Welsh Piper has a great random table this week for creating religious orders. Perhaps they’ll figure prominently in your campaign, or perhaps the PCs stumbled across one. Either way, the article is a great primer, and the table is a quick way to generate one.

Big Ball of No Fun gives us some good ideas for making an NPC memorable, even when the PCs aren’t interacting directly with them. Keeping key NPCs in the forefront of the players mind is a great trick.

Finally, have you been wondering about Dungeon Command? Check out the review over at Breakfast for Owlbears. It makes us want to give it a try…

Blast From The Past (Weekly Roundup: 2011 GenCon Schedule Edition)

Dice Monkey started a new series hacking Gamma World into traditional D&D. Also note the link in the article to Chaos Grenade, who is doing something similar.

 

Weekly Roundup: Why I’m Taking A Hiatus Edition

So, D&D is in a unique place right now. As is my life. Lately, I’ve felt as though 4e content is in less demand because of D&D Next. However, D&D Next is still in a playtest phase, so designing something for that would just be silly. I don’t have any interest in discussing my thoughts on the playtest beyond what we intend to do on the podcast (more episodes to come), so what’s a D&D blogger to do? At the same time, I’ve been feeling really crunched lately in my personal life, and also as though this blog is sometimes taking up more than its fair share of my free time. So, I’ve decided to back off on the amount of posting I’ll be doing during this summer. Don’t worry though, I’ll still post periodically; when I do, it will be on Thursdays. I will also still be doing the weekly roundup every week. The sorts of things you can expect in this timeframe will be system neutral for the most part. Perhaps some hand drawn dungeon maps, dungeon accessories articles, and general thoughts on DMing. In the meantime, I’ll be catching up on my D&D reading, focusing on my weekly D&D summer campaign, and spending time with my family.

Speaking of the playtest, there was a new article in the Protection From Chaos series at Loremaster this week. It’s written by an attorney, and it discusses the playtest agreement (that you most likely didn’t read).

IntWisCha had a great article on different types of treasure. Not the normal gold, gems, and statuettes, but rather all sorts of paper items that the party would consider non-traditional treasure worth pursuing. Lots of good hooks there too, if you’ve hit writer’s block this week.

On Twitter this week, SlyFlourish linked to this controversial article at UAD&D which is an open letter to WotC about the new edition. (It’s kind of long, but well written. Set some time aside for this one)

At Alphastream‘s WotC blog, he talks about the influence of other genres on D&D. Also, don’t skip over the link in the article to Last Stand At Camp Starfall, which will take you to a full adventure that he wrote as part of May of the Dead.

And speaking of May of the Dead, it wrapped up this week. You can head over to Going Last to see the whole list of articles from the carnival; lots and lots (and lots) of really good stuff there. We were impressed.

Finally, if you were following the One Page Dungeon Contest, the winners were announced this week! Check them out, and download some free one page goodness!

Blast From The Past (Weekly Roundup: New Kickstarter Widget Edition)

If you’re currently feeling in a more cerebral mood, you should definitely check out the article at Geek Related on what RPGs teach you.  That, and there’s apparently an International Journal of Roleplaying.  Who knew? (link to the Journal in Geek Related’s article…)
(6/5/11)

Weekly Roundup: Wayne Foundation Charity RPG Bundle Edition

In case you didn’t know, there is currently a sale of an RPG bundle going on to benefit The Wayne Foundation. By purchasing this bundle of RPGs, you’re not only getting a ton of awesome content, but you’re also benefitting a charity that is dedicated to eradicating undearage prostitution. To further entice everyone to buy the bundle and contribute to this charity, we will donate $1 for every bundle purchased, up to $1,000. Just send us the receipt from Drive Thru RPG. You can purchase this huge bundle of RPGs and RPG content (including 4e content!) from Drive Thru RPG by using this link. You can track the status of our match over on the sidebar there. 
(UPDATE: You don’t need to send us a receipt, just buy a bundle. We now have access to the total number of bundles sold.)

First up this week is not a blog article, but a fun little choose your own adventure game that we thought we’d link to in honor of the May of the Dead carnival going on over at Going Last. It places you in the middle of a zombie apocalypse.

We were pleasantly surprised to see Legend4ry DnD begin a conversion of the old school Dyson’s Delve. We’re excited to see the final product. The original Dyson’s Delve (here) was written by Dyson Logos.

With the public playtest of D&D Next coming up on May 24th, Greywulf’s Lair tackled the issue of playtesting, and what it is (and isn’t).

Every once in a while, we see an article that really sparks our imagination. DMG 42 hit the ball out of the park this week. He described a system in which worldbuilding between the DM and players was collaborative in a really hands on way. We really really want to try this.

Dungeon’s Master did a little thinking this week about the fate of the Character Builder.  Has it become as necessary as the PHB? Do you hope it sticks around?

Finally, at Cinerati this week, a mystery of gaming history was brought to our attention. Who was Gigi D’arn? Even if you’ve never heard of her, by the end of the article, you’ll probably want to figure it out…

Blast From The Past (Weekly Roundup: D&D Perfume Edition)

At-Will had a discussion of what sorts of challenges you should throw at your epic tier players.  No, not what sorts of monsters.  What sorts of challenges.  Check it out if you’re struggling with your epic tier storyline.

Weekly Roundup: May Of The Dead Is Coming Edition

We haven’t seen a blogfest in a while. If you recall, we participated in Winter is Coming, A Night in the Lonesome October, and Got Loot. Starting this week, there will be another blogfest happening for the entire month of May. This one, entitled May of the Dead will be hosted by the guys at Going Last. As a participating blog, we got an early look at the calendar. It looks like there’s a lot of fun stuff lined up. We’ve also got three articles in the queue; keep an eye out for the first one this Friday.

The biggest news this week was the departure of Monte Cook from the D&D Next team. The announcement at his blog was short and vague, and others had thoughts as well. (The previous is, of course, only one opinion. We’re sure with a search, you’ll turn up more speculation than we care to read.)

Rules as UNWritten this week posted some thoughts about the Alchemy rules, both for the current edition and the next. Should all consumables simply be alchemical items, or is there something to be gained by categorizing some as magic?

Over at Geek’s Dream Girl we got a little advice on bringing non-gamers to the table. Great advice for that inevitable game night when you’re one short and your mom is the only one around.

Then there was the announcement this week at Larval Subjects of a new book coming out entitled Dungeons & Dragons & Philosophy. Might be worth checking out.

RPG Athenaeum is doing a lot of great work bringing true medieval  history to your D&D game. For example, this week’s article on real professions that you’ve probably never given to an NPC.

Finally, don’t forget about the two contests going on – Stuffer Shack‘s Site of the Year contest has its winner announced tomorrow, and tomorrow is also the deadline to get your One Page Dungeon in! (There’s still time. Really. It’s just a page. Get on it!)

Blast From The Past (Weekly Roundup: Gamma World Thoughts Edition)

Intwischa (like this: Int Wis Cha… get it?) posted some tips on how to run a better 4e game.  Caution: if you’re a “play by the rules” type, this article may make you angry.  Or shake your head.  That’s ok, there’s plenty to think about there, and everyone could take to heart one or two of the tips.
(4/30/11)

Weekly Roundup: Errata Messed Me Up Edition

After our last podcast, I was exploring feats and options for different animal companion builds. I found a fun combo, and was in the midst of writing up an article about it. Then the WotC March errata came out. Turns out that this build must have been on their radar because some of the errata specifically changed wording in the feat and paragon path to make the combo impossible. Oh well, it was still a fun exercise. (For those of you curious, Beastmaster Ranger, Beast Protector feat, and Sharpshooter Paragon Path). On to the articles!

On Twitter this week, SlyFlourish pointed to a Story Games article that has some phenomenal tips on running a great 4e game. Even if you don’t take all the advice, there’s sure to be something that you find helpful.

Rule of the Dice wrote a short anecdote about how he tried to teach his son about D&D through the Facebook game Heroes of Neverwinter. Find out if it worked for him or not.

There were a couple of notable articles out of WotC this week. First, John Schindehette, WotC’s art director, talked about art across the editions. This is an important discussion, given recent discussions about appropriate armor and depictions of women in RPGs. Second, Chris Perkins posted a DDi only index of every Dungeon Magazine adventure published in the last 200 issues.

A few weeks ago, in the Weekly Roundup, we linked to an article that examined monster damage at first level, and extrapolated that through all 30 levels. Going Last posted an article this week that looks at the other side of the equation: character damage.

 Robert Schwalb wrote a quick article about his thoughts on a way that sneak attack/backstab might work in the next edition of D&D.

Finally, in case you hadn’t heard, you might want to check out the stories about the Norwegian Minister of International Development. Apparently, he’s into D&D, and quite vocal about it. You can start with this article at The Escapist.

 Blast from the Past (Weekly Roundup: RegulatorCon Edition)

If you’re looking to give your players a moral dilemma to wrestle with instead of a cave full of monsters to destory, check out Do the Ends Justify the Means over at RPG Musings.  A ton of good adventure seeds to steal there.
(3/26/11)

 

Weekly Roundup: Did The Roman Empire Play D&D Edition

How old is D&D? Almost 40 years, right? Hmmm… think again. It seems the Roman Empire may have invented the d20. So, ok, maybe it wasn’t used for D&D, but it’s pretty cool to think that the d20 has been around since at least the Roman Empire. Which gets our imaginations going… what WAS it used for? (via Going Last)

There’s some news out about the upcoming Pathfinder MMO over at Geek Related that doesn’t sound too promising. In an MMO world dominated by WoW, how do you make your product different enough to stand out, while still making it something people want to play?

Troll in the Corner had a great suggestion to track what’s going on in your campaign, while at the same time gauging what plot hooks your players are interested in. Called “Big Open Questions,” it’s worth a read if you’re not sure what direction your game should go in next.

Next time you’re in need of a really quick random room, check out the two part table from Gamer Assembly. First, you get a room type, then one defining feature in that room. It’s that simple. Give it a try!

Of course, one thing that also might be in such a room is a Pink Dragon. That’s right. A Pink Dragon, complete with sparkles and rainbows. You know you want to click through…. (via That Robed Guy)

For all the old school Gamma World fans out there, the news out of D&D Nexus is good. Metamorphosis Alpha (Gamma World’s predecessor) is back in print at LuLu.

RPG Athanaeum gave us some ideas on how to “reverse engineer” 4e modules to be more like first edition adventures.

Over at the WotC community blogs, Wrecan introduced three additional pillars of D&D (the original three are Combat, Exploration, and Roleplaying), and Jester waxed philosophical on rules for roleplaying.

Finally, Twitter was abuzz this week with everyone’s “Fourthcore Villan Name.” Find out yours at Save Vs. Death‘s name generator.

Blast From The Past (Weekly Roundup: Postponed Game Edition)

Icosahedrophilia (say THAT five times fast…) had a very interesting article on the history of miniatures in D&D.  Specifically, how the rules, as written, supported (or didn’t support) the use of miniatures on a battle map.  Good read, even if you’re only interested in the general history of D&D.
(2/6/11)

Weekly Roundup: Modified Mini Edition

 Waaaay back many months ago, we had a contest to celebrate our 100th post. We must talk a good game on the blog here because one of the winners of the contest asked for a miniature modification that was way beyond our ability to do. So, instead of just saying “no,” we reached out to Ian from the Going Last Podcast to see if he was willing to help us out. He accepted the challenge, and below are the stunning results. 

Our contest winner wanted to make the D&D Dire Ape miniature look like Donkey Kong. Here is what the Dire Ape looks like:

  

I had a barrel from Showcase Terrain that I sent to Ian along with the mini. Ian cut the raised fist off, sculpted a hand around the barrel, and reattached it to the mini. The bottom of the barrels are smooth, so he added planks to the bottom of the barrel. He also added a tie to the mini, and built out the lower jaw a bit. Below are pictures of the finished product. (Click for big)

 

And now, on to the roundup…

We always like to see character backgrounds that are not “My character is an orphan.” If you’re looking for ideas, check out the Dungeon’s Master Origin Story switched at birth.

If you’re a fan of random tables, you need to check out the one posted at Land of Nod this week. It’s a Random Idol Generator. Even if you don’t use it in a game on the fly, it is sure to give you some ideas!

Rumor has it that the D&D Next playtest at DDXP was in the classic Caves of Chaos. Check out the work The Weem did this week on the Caves of Chaos Map Remakes. They look awesome!

The wishlists for D&D Next continue. Check out what Squaremans said about his D&D and his non-rules wishlist for D&D Next.

Campaign Mastery‘s article on alternate histories in RPGs was geared more towards an RPG that diverges from actual world history into a fictional world history, but it could also be applied to fantasy worlds that have a strong canon as well (Forgotten Realms, we’re looking at you…)

Finally, check out the 2e Monstrous Manual Online that someone on Twitter pointed to this week. And yes, the Flumph is there!

Blast From The Past (Weekly Roundup: DDXP 2011 Edition)

The Labyrinth had a great article about the process they used to find a new player for their game.  While their success rate varied, you might find a resource here that you haven’t used yet.  Or you might just find the story of them trying to find a new player entertaining.
(1/30/11)

Weekly Roundup – Dungeon Geomorph Dice Edition

This week, we found the Dungeon Geomorph Dice project on Kickstarter.  We were so excited, we threw $40 in the pot for two sets of dice (and crossed our fingers for the second “caverns” set).  Here’s why you should, too: we will be developing some free supplements to these dice for you to use.  Just to be clear, we’re not affiliated with this project in any way; we just think they’re really cool, and wanted to try and make them as useful as possible.  We won’t start working on this project until we have the dice in hand and see what kind of supplements have been shipped with them.  The stuff we develop will be completely 4e compatible.  Spread the word by using the Facebook, Twitter, and other icons at the end of this post!

On to the articles…

The Labyrinth had an interesting discussion on generating ability scores based upon percentiles instead of 4d6.  The most intriguing part of his system was the racial adjustments of probabilites for each stat.

Then there was Dread Gazebo (with his fancy new blog layout!) who encouraged DMs to abandon the XP budget.  This, of course, sparked some debate, and Sarah Darkmagic weighed in with a counterpoint.

Did we mention there’s a contest to win Heroes of Shadow over at A Walk in the Dark? Yup.  Go check it out if you want to win it.

On the podcast side of things, we urge you to check out the Going Last podcast.  There’s lots of miniatures talk, and non-D&D “general gaming” talk as well, so if you’re into that sort of thing, give it a listen.

Finally, The Rhetorical Gamer talked about what 4e got wrong, in his opinion.  And, to be fair, last week he also wrote about what it got right.  Check it out, and see if you agree.

Who are we missing?  Anyone?  Anyone?