Tag Archives: Howling Tower

Weekly Roundup: PBS Idea Channel Edition

This week, the Youtube PBS Idea channel emailed us. They recently posted a video entitled “Can Dungeons & Dragons Make You A Confident And Successful Person?” It’s an interesting discussion, and makes some good points. It’s a fun video to watch in its entirety, but if you want to skip the whole “What is D&D? How do you play?” bit, go to the 2:50 mark. Thought provoking, and you can leave comments that they’ll respond to in a future episode. Incidentally, they cover other nerdy topics like “Is Dr. Who a Religion?” and “What do MP3s and Magic Spells Have In Common?”

If you’re looking for a good Halloween adventure to run for your group, look no further than A Walk In The Dark who announced intentions to publish just such a module. Keep an eye on this one folks.

If you’re looking for some interesting loot to add to your next adventure, why not a treasure map? It’s an adventure hook within the loot! Check out The Dungeon’s Master for details.

At The Howling Tower this week, Steve Winter looks at magic items in D&D Next. Specifically, should characters having magic items be assumed in the setting, or is there a better way to handle them?

It’s been a couple of months since Gencon, so it’s fun to look back at a newbie’s experience. Check out how 20 Foot Radius fared in his first Gencon ever. (Also, I met Alton at Gencon; seemed like he was having a pretty good time!) If you’re looking for more Gencon retrospectives, This Is My Game had a short series recently as well.

If you’re into real medieval history, then check out The Wargaming Site this week, where they cover everything you need to know about the English longbow.

If you’re interested in the reprint of the Dungeon! game, you can check out an unboxing over at Wired Geek Dad. Nostalgia, here we come!

Finally, we were very interested in the recent release of the Midgard Campaign Setting. While there isn’t a 4e specific version, we may still pick it up for the fluff. This looks like a very unique and complete setting. We also have some fun ideas for a campaign there, stay tuned. There were reviews this week at The Iron Tavern and also at Stargazer’s World.

Blast From The Past (Weekly Roundup: One Last Winter Is Coming Link Edition)

Stuffer Shack promised to multiply your game’s fun by ten by adding a simple house rule.

Weekly Roundup: Unhallowed Grove Map Edition

So this weekend, I decided to dust off Dundjinni and whip up a quick map for Friday’s Unhallowed Grove encounter. You can find it below, and I’ve also added it to the article’s page. The article’s page includes explanations. It’s not super fancy, but then, it’s been a while since I used the program. I’m beginning to remember how easy and fun the program is, so I hope to make some more maps in the coming months.

There was a great article at The Illuminerdy this week about how to make cons more fun. Everyone needs to add the phrase to their vocabulary, so that we all have more fun at cons.

Steve Winter at The Howling Tower mused upon the random encounter. Once a staple of D&D, it has in recent editions gone away. Steve takes on what a random encounter should be, and how to make them a good part of your game.

The Dungeon’s Master this week addressed the use of torture by PCs. Also, how intimidate is not the same thing. We have also addressed this subject (from a different angle) here.

Alex Schroeder, the guy who runs the One Page Dungeon Contest, wrote up a cool little post on how he strung together some of his favorite one page dungeons from the contest to make a campaign out of them.

We haven’t linked to The Labyrinth in a while, but they’re still making some beautiful, free world maps over there!

From The Sorcerer’s Skull posted the true story of a cave that was found in North America, full of skeletons and treasure. Complete with a map just begging to be dropped into a game.

The Retro Roleplaying blog talked about why some OSR players reject improvements to the D&D system. We disagree to an extent, and feel that the author cherry picked some of his examples, but it’s still worth a read.

Finally, in Wired this month, there was a very interesting article that I think absolutely should have talked about D&D. But it didn’t. Apparently the author, Clive Thompson, doesn’t know what we do. Check it out, and here’s a quote – email the author if this sounds familiar:

Paracosms are the fantasy worlds that many dreamy, imaginative kids like to invent when they’re young. Some of history’s most creative adults had engaged in “worldplay” as children. The Brontë siblings, in one famous example, concocted paracosms so elaborate that they documented them with meticulous maps, drawings, and hundreds of pages of encyclopedic writing.

Blast From The Past (Weekly Roundup: Last Call For Dungeon Geomorph Dice Edition)

Initiative Or What? had a cool article this week on different found objects that were useful as props for their D&D game.  We especially like the idea to use novelty ice cube trays for casting 3D terrain decorations.
(5/14/11)

Weekly Roundup: Papercraft Dragon Edition

This week, Wizards of the Coast posted a papercraft dragon on the D&D site. If you’d like to make one and display it on your desk, coffee table, or nightstand, here’s the link… just don’t take it in the shower with you. Below is the results of our efforts 

In this picture, I am moving his head up and down to make him talk. I swear that glass of wine has nothing to do with my behavior.

Do the characters in your game have no real connection to one another? Is “why are we adventuring together?” a question no one dares ask for fear that the answer will be a shoulder shrug? Try this exercise on the card provided at Some Space To Think this week.

Greyhawk Grognard posted his first impressions of Dungeon Crawl Classic. This is a new RPG system with a real old-school feel to it. If that’s something you’re hoping for in D&D Next, DCC might be a good way to get an early fix.

The new Charactergen blog had a good article on the power of “yes, and” and its nemesis “well, actually.” (Disclosure: F-bombs) You’ll remember we talked about “yes, and” in a recent article about quests.

RPG Musings posted some thoughts on what classes could look like in D&D Next. Some interesting thoughts on how “classes” might be more like “roles.”

Steve Winter posted a week’s worth of articles on the subject of random encounters at Howling Tower. They’re something that were eschewed in 3 and 4e, and may be making some kind of comeback in 5e.

Finally, Save Vs. Death posted their submission to the One Page Dungeon Contest, titled The Tears of Mother Pestilence. By the way, if you go to the contest page, you can find links to all the current submissions!

Blast From The Past (Weekly Roundup: Did Ya Miss It? Edition)

While this isn’t really the point of The Dungeon’s Master‘s article, I found the idea of having character “trees” in this article intriguing.  Does anyone else play with a stable of characters as opposed to one character?
(4/9/11) 

RAWR! Lil' Flame is coming to get you!

 

Weekly Roundup: New Homebrew Campaign Edition

This coming weekend, our group is going to be starting a new 4e homebrew campaign. A little Greyhawk, and a little special ops, we’re pretty excited to get going on it. If you want to hear more, stay tuned for our next podcast, hopefully going up sometime this week.

Kobold Quarterly posted its first article by WotC alum Steve Winter this week. He talks about lethality in D&D, and whether you should expect your character to survive until level 30. If you want more of Steve’s musings, he has his own blog at Howling Tower.

About a month ago, we posted an article on making an interesting solo in 10 seconds. Extended Rest tried the technique and blogged about it. See how it turned out!

If you’ve ever played one of those old school “text adventure” computer games, you’ll enjoy the Exits Are project. While not an RPG, per se, it’s very RPG-ish, and very cool.

Blog of Holding wrapped up its series “Playing D&D With Mike Mornard.” Check out all seven parts, they’re all good. (Mike Mornard played in Gary Gygax’s D&D game, as well as Dave Arneson’s)

What do you do when a party goal could be accomplished most easily by a single character? The Dungeon’s Master tackled the question this week.

If you’ve played Revenge of the Iron Lich, be sure to head over to Save vs. Death to leave your first impressions and memories. RotIL turned 1 this week!

Finally, check out the new animated webseries from ENWorld called “The Perturbed Dragon.” The prologue is currently up for your viewing pleasure.

Blast From The Past (Weekly Roundup: Who Wins The Free Book Edition)

The Hopeless Gamer had an amazing guest post detailing how to make a ravine for your miniature game terrain.  Say it with me: Arts…..And…..Crafts!!!

Weekly Roundup: Impending Scheduling Change Edition

In the next few weeks, I’ll be changing the article schedule on the site. For those of you who pay attention, you’ve noticed that I post articles on Tues/Thurs and the weekly roundup on Sunday. I’ll be moving the posting schedule to Wed/Fri; the weekly roundup will remain on Sunday. This is most likely a temporary change – Wed/Fri is more convenient for my life right now, but when things get back to normal, I’ll probably go back to Tues/Thurs. So if you show up one Tuesday, and there’s no article, well, that’s what happened.

Over at This Is My Game, DeadOrcs posted some great thoughts on using a wizard’s implement as a weapon. Depending upon what implement you use, you get to add a special rider to your attacks. Worth a look. (We also love the new site art for the articles!)

At ENWorld, site owner Morrus started a discussion on why he hopes the Forgotten Realms isn’t updated for D&D 5e. We certainly see his points (especially the comment about kitchen sinks), though coming at the argument from a perspective of “I don’t care about the Forgotten Realms, so you shouldn’t either” might not necessarily win people over. We would, however, like to see what Wizards could come up with for a brand new setting. Maybe another Eberron style contest?

We loved the article by Vanir over at Critical Hits this week. We too would love to see digital tools opened up to third parties to see what the community comes up with (even if a lot of the technical jargon went over our heads…).

With all the talk of the next edition of D&D, Bat in the Attic posted a list of all the versions of D&D. It’s basically just the list, but an interesting read nonetheless.

John Du Bois followed up on the article he wrote for us this week with an article on his own blog where he discusses the difference between a “judge” and a “DM.” For those not in the know, “judge” is the commonly used term for DMs who run adventures for living campaigns.

Howling Tower discussed the problem of illusory math on his site this week – that is, the escalation of monster AC that keeps pace with the party’s to-hit bonuses.

Way back in 2010, we wrote an article on ship combat. As a result, we’re always on the lookout for good ship combat mechanics, so we were happy to see Troll in the Corner post an article on just that topic this week.

Finally, in case you missed it this week, Wizards of the Coast announced that it will be re-releasing the first edition D&D core rulebooks. Keep an eye out for them starting in April!

Blast From The Past (Weekly Roundup: Finished Sea Maiden Edition)

Board Enterprises had some interesting thoughts about whether or not you should map out locations in your campaign.  While a definitive solution to the problem was not presented, it certainly gave us something to think about.
(1/16/11)