Tag Archives: Illuminerdy

Weekly Roundup: Unhallowed Grove Map Edition

So this weekend, I decided to dust off Dundjinni and whip up a quick map for Friday’s Unhallowed Grove encounter. You can find it below, and I’ve also added it to the article’s page. The article’s page includes explanations. It’s not super fancy, but then, it’s been a while since I used the program. I’m beginning to remember how easy and fun the program is, so I hope to make some more maps in the coming months.

There was a great article at The Illuminerdy this week about how to make cons more fun. Everyone needs to add the phrase to their vocabulary, so that we all have more fun at cons.

Steve Winter at The Howling Tower mused upon the random encounter. Once a staple of D&D, it has in recent editions gone away. Steve takes on what a random encounter should be, and how to make them a good part of your game.

The Dungeon’s Master this week addressed the use of torture by PCs. Also, how intimidate is not the same thing. We have also addressed this subject (from a different angle) here.

Alex Schroeder, the guy who runs the One Page Dungeon Contest, wrote up a cool little post on how he strung together some of his favorite one page dungeons from the contest to make a campaign out of them.

We haven’t linked to The Labyrinth in a while, but they’re still making some beautiful, free world maps over there!

From The Sorcerer’s Skull posted the true story of a cave that was found in North America, full of skeletons and treasure. Complete with a map just begging to be dropped into a game.

The Retro Roleplaying blog talked about why some OSR players reject improvements to the D&D system. We disagree to an extent, and feel that the author cherry picked some of his examples, but it’s still worth a read.

Finally, in Wired this month, there was a very interesting article that I think absolutely should have talked about D&D. But it didn’t. Apparently the author, Clive Thompson, doesn’t know what we do. Check it out, and here’s a quote – email the author if this sounds familiar:

Paracosms are the fantasy worlds that many dreamy, imaginative kids like to invent when they’re young. Some of history’s most creative adults had engaged in “worldplay” as children. The Brontë siblings, in one famous example, concocted paracosms so elaborate that they documented them with meticulous maps, drawings, and hundreds of pages of encyclopedic writing.

Blast From The Past (Weekly Roundup: Last Call For Dungeon Geomorph Dice Edition)

Initiative Or What? had a cool article this week on different found objects that were useful as props for their D&D game.  We especially like the idea to use novelty ice cube trays for casting 3D terrain decorations.
(5/14/11)

Weekly Roundup: Shameless Plea For Votes Edition

This week, the folks over at The Illuminerdy posted the finalists to their RPG Hook contest, and we’re on the list! Head over there and vote for your favorites, and if one of your favorites happens to be the one by @bandofmisfits, well, we won’t complain… but really, we just want to see LOTS of votes!

This week, The Learning DM listed a few ways to use poker chips in your game. Leave something in the article’s comments about how you use (or would use) poker chips in your games.

Newbie DM had some great ideas for getting poster maps printed on the cheap.  Also, there is an online printer listed in the comments that you don’t want to miss.

Some Space to Think had an excellent article analyzing why you don’t see enough role playing in your game. You may be surprised at the answer.

Reality Refracted raised some interesting points about social combat in RPGs this week.  While we wish there had been more of a resolution to the problems presented, there were a lot of issues that we were nodding our heads to. Especially check out the “There Are No Social Hit Points” paragraph.

Finally, if you’re one of the 3 RPG players that have never heard of Obsidian Portal, check out the advantages of using it from Geek Ken this week.

 

Weekly Roundup: End of Campaign Edition

This past week saw the last session of our two year long campaign.  The group of guys we DM for are all headed off to college.  We were able to finish the story quest that was introduced in the very first session, so we think everyone went away with a bit of closure.  What’s next?  We’re not sure.  Perhaps a Gamma World campaign with another group of high schoolers, and also getting back into playing and DMing LFR with a group that has recently drifted a bit.  Plus, we’re still involved in D&D Encounters.  Here is the week in articles:

Some Space to Think mused upon the differences between 4e and 1e – from a first person perspective.

Omnivoracious‘ “How to Write Betrayal” has some great tips that DMs can use in plotting out a story arc that includes… well, betrayal.

Also, make sure you catch The ID DM‘s article on a psychological experiment that was done in the 1960’s, and how you can incorporate a little bit of morality psychology into your game.

Save Versus Death posted the first of his new mini dungeon modules, Gallery of the Hate Blossom.  Weighing in at four pages, it’s a great mini delve, and we hope to see more mini delves from him and other sources in the near future. (There were also Twitter rumors of Fourthcore one page delves this week)

Finally, did you miss the contest at The Angry DM this week? If you follow us on Twitter, you shouldn’t have. It’s a cool logic puzzle worth trying to solve (and steal) even if you didn’t get your entry in under the deadline. (Answer is here)You can still enter the Illuminerdy contest though, if you’re looking to win stuff.

Weekly Roundup: (Mostly) Post Gencon Wrapup Edition

We’re back from Gencon! Check out tomorrow’s podcast for Benoit’s thoughts and experiences (among other things).  Until then, here’s some Gencon goodness in the Weekly Roundup (plus some other stuff).

First, we’ll do a quick roundup of bloggers that blogged about their experiences at Gencon this week:

Also, we would be remiss if we did not provide a link to the Ennie winners (click through to the pdf).  Congratulations to everyone who won!

Finally, Critical Hits did a great summary of the Wizards of the Coast New Products seminar.  If you want to know what’s in the pipeline over at WotC, check it out. Also, Alphastream included a few links on his blog to followup information on the new products, as well as his thoughts.

And then some non-Gencon articles we noticed:

Every DM knows that inspiration for their campaign is all around us.  From paintings, to literature, to actual history.  If you’re looking for historical inspiration, check out Illuminerdy‘s primer on the ancient Mexican city of Chichen Itza, complete with campaign and plot hook ideas.

Heroes of Shadow posted a brief overview and review of the Neverwinter Fortune cards.  We’ll be discussing them in tomorrow’s podcast as well, so tune in for that.

At-Will wrote about why it’s hard to make hard encounters.

Finally, where current events and gaming meet, we find this story about some London looters and a Games Workshop store. (Edit: We’re not sure if this story is for real)

Whose Gencon wrapup did we miss?  Link it in the comments!