Tag Archives: Land of Nod

Weekly Roundup: Plagmada Edition

Apparently, this has been on lots of people’s radar for about nine months now, but it’s only recently come to our attention: the site Plagmada.org (Play Generated Map and Document Archive). It’s an archive of hand drawn dungeons and adventures, mostly written by us gamers back when we were young gamers.  And bonus! They’re now running a Kickstarter that you can check out if you’re into that sort of thing. Either way, the archive is definitely worth browsing. Lots of nostalgia to be had. Go get some!

First up, the submission window for Dungeon and Dragon is now open – you can check out the submission guidelines for this window here.

Thoughtcrime Games is bringing their 4th Edition Worldbreakers into 13th Age. You may remember them as the At-Will guys. See how they tweaked the Worldbreaker rules for a new system.

If you’re looking for a free adventure this week, look no further than The Dungeon Oracle who posted an awesome fourthcore style adventure entitled Colossus of the Shattered Moon. It’s system neutral, so anyone can use it. Great for a one shot.

The She DM had a great guest post this week on theology in your game. In a world where many gods is normal, what does religion look like to the average person? This series aims to explore.

Dungeon’s Master had a post on collaborative dungeon design. Yes, we’ve heard about collaborative worldbuilding, and even group character creation, but dungeon design? Check it out.

Reality Refracted discussed using a prison break as a campaign starter.  How it would work, and why you should try it.

Everyone loves a good barfight, but not everyone loves the boring slugfest that sometimes results. To add a little flavor and a lot of simplicity to your next barfight, check out The Land of Nod‘s bar fight matrix.

Finally, in his WotC blog, Jester wrote about leaving room for improv, both in the setting of your game as well as the rules of your game.

Blast From The Past (Weekly Roundup: Next Few Weeks Edition)

Dungeon’s Master wrote about the 8 things they’ve learned by playing in the Encounters program.  These are good lessons for anyone just picking up the DM mantle, and good reminders for those of us who have been wearing it for a long time.

Weekly Roundup: Gencon Excitement Edition

We’re excited for Gencon this week. Not the 9 hour drive before and after, but hey, gotta take the good with the bad, right? We’re hoping to get in some good gaming, have fun at the Ennies, and run some memorable Ashes of Athas adventures for unsuspecting con-goers. Should be fun. On to the articles…

First up this week is a well researched article on the second roleplaying game ever invented. There’s some interesting history here. Have you heard of it? (Check out the rest of the Playing at the World blog for other articles on the early history of the hobby…)

We know you’ve been missing Flumphs lately, and that’s why we give you this hilarious meme, presented by The Looney DM.

The Land of Nod had a fun tutorial on drawing old school maps in Excel. Hey, use what you’ve got, right?

And of course, we couldn’t ignore the 5 reasons to play D&D over at Grimm Wisdom this week. Via Boing Boing, natch.

And while we’re doing lists, The Rhetorical Gamer had a list of 10 reasons D&D is better than an MMORPG.

Swords and Dorkery had a shivers inducing idea for DIY bug miniatures. Shivers in a good way. And yes, you’re probably assuming correctly. Sort of.

If your party is due to encounter a basilisk anytime soon, you may want to invest in some mirrored armor and rakes. i09 has all the details on hunting them.

The Rhetorical Gamer had some great thoughts on why games should be hard. He starts with video games, but then asks, should that apply to RPGs?

Finally, we haven’t linked to one of The Labyrinth‘s awesome blank maps in a while, so here’s one for you to fill in, at your leisure.

Now get back to packing for Gencon!

 

Weekly Roundup: Modified Mini Edition

 Waaaay back many months ago, we had a contest to celebrate our 100th post. We must talk a good game on the blog here because one of the winners of the contest asked for a miniature modification that was way beyond our ability to do. So, instead of just saying “no,” we reached out to Ian from the Going Last Podcast to see if he was willing to help us out. He accepted the challenge, and below are the stunning results. 

Our contest winner wanted to make the D&D Dire Ape miniature look like Donkey Kong. Here is what the Dire Ape looks like:

  

I had a barrel from Showcase Terrain that I sent to Ian along with the mini. Ian cut the raised fist off, sculpted a hand around the barrel, and reattached it to the mini. The bottom of the barrels are smooth, so he added planks to the bottom of the barrel. He also added a tie to the mini, and built out the lower jaw a bit. Below are pictures of the finished product. (Click for big)

 

And now, on to the roundup…

We always like to see character backgrounds that are not “My character is an orphan.” If you’re looking for ideas, check out the Dungeon’s Master Origin Story switched at birth.

If you’re a fan of random tables, you need to check out the one posted at Land of Nod this week. It’s a Random Idol Generator. Even if you don’t use it in a game on the fly, it is sure to give you some ideas!

Rumor has it that the D&D Next playtest at DDXP was in the classic Caves of Chaos. Check out the work The Weem did this week on the Caves of Chaos Map Remakes. They look awesome!

The wishlists for D&D Next continue. Check out what Squaremans said about his D&D and his non-rules wishlist for D&D Next.

Campaign Mastery‘s article on alternate histories in RPGs was geared more towards an RPG that diverges from actual world history into a fictional world history, but it could also be applied to fantasy worlds that have a strong canon as well (Forgotten Realms, we’re looking at you…)

Finally, check out the 2e Monstrous Manual Online that someone on Twitter pointed to this week. And yes, the Flumph is there!

Blast From The Past (Weekly Roundup: DDXP 2011 Edition)

The Labyrinth had a great article about the process they used to find a new player for their game.  While their success rate varied, you might find a resource here that you haven’t used yet.  Or you might just find the story of them trying to find a new player entertaining.
(1/30/11)