Tag Archives: The Id DM

Weekly Roundup: New Oldest D20 Edition

A while back, we announced right here on the Weekly Roundup that the oldest d20 had been found. It was up for auction, made of glass, and belonged to some role playing ancient Roman. Well, an older one has been found. This one’s Egyptian. Guess the pharaohs were casting magic missile at the darkness before the cesars…

First up this week, we have a big announcement from Kobold Quarterly… that they’re closing. That may sound a bit extreme – the print magazine is closing. We wish them well, and hope this means even more quality Midgard stuff from them in the years to come. Speaking of which, they’re currently running a contest to find a writer for a new adventure.

Big Ball of No Fun talked a bit about the new Monk release for D&D Next that we saw this week. He also talked about a radical new way to deal with alignments – one that seems like it would work beautifully.

Dungeon’s Master had a fun idea to add a new dimension to your player’s roleplaying. Use bingo cards at the table. Not the kind with numbers and letters, but rather a list of things the player or character tries to do.

The Id DM had a really interesting article this week on the future of the RPG industry as it relates to the rise of digital media. Even if you’re not interested in the impact of PDFs on RPGs, there are some really interesting thoughts (and links!) in this article.

Alex Schroeder posted his own take on how to make a dungeon. For your home game, not for publication. He makes that distinction, and we think it’s important.

Hack and Slash encouraged us to contribute to the Abulafia wiki. It’s a wiki that aggregates random RPG generators. Sounds really really useful? Yeah. So we should all be contributing to it.

Finally, we posted a very rough prototype for our NaGa DeMon game (Backyard Wars) just this week, and we thought we’d point to three more prototypes that are up: John DuBoisBread and CircusesShorty Monster‘s Excitement and Adventure, and Wombat’s Gaming Den of Iniquity‘s The Domain Game. By the way, there’s a “Roll Call” on the NaGa DeMon site, if you want an idea of who else is participating.

Blast From The Past (Weekly Roundup: Reading A Night In The Lonesome October Edition)

Stuffer Shack had some great thoughts as to whether PVP in an RPG is kosher, or whether it’s bad form. Weigh in with your own thoughts in the comments their article.

Weekly Roundup: Decompressing From Gencon Edition

Well, another Gencon has come and gone, and scores of nerds across the world (the world!) have seen a drop in their work productivity this past week due to something known as “Gencon Hangover.” We had a great time, and hope everyone at our tables did as well. As for everything else we did there, well, what happens at Gencon stays at Gencon. Wait, is that right? Hmmm…. at any rate, we assure you it’s not as mysterious (or naughty) as it sounds.

If you’ve never been to Gencon, and want a blow by blow summary from a noob, look no further than the great summary posted by The Id DM this week. (Including the fact that there also happened to be a bike rally going on at the same time) If you want a more veteran perspective, you’ll have to check out DeadOrcs’ post on This Is My Game.

Of course, if you’re looking for more Gencon goodness, you can’t go wrong with all the WotC seminars on one page, for your viewing pleasure. If you’d rather listen to them than watch them, then it’s over to The Tome Show for you! (Or you could check out a rough summary on the Forbes blog.)

Neuroglyph Games also talked a bit about the Gencon seminars, and why they convinced him to keep playtesting.

RPG Musings is starting a new campaign, and shared some steps they go through when planning. Good thoughts, as it seems September is a common time to start new campaigns.

Merric’s Musings has been reviewing old 1e and 2e adventure modules lately. This link is to a review of The Secret of Bone Hill, but there are plenty more on the blog. (We feel this is self-evident, but also feel it’s necessary to note that there are spoilers involved.)

The Other Side asked this week if the OSR (Old School Renaissance) is dead. Later this week, a followup was posted.

Of course, the other HUGE news this week that everyone was watching was the amazingly successful Reaper Bones Kickstarter. Just this week, 1000 Foot General posted a review on this new casting material.

And if you’re interested in the new Dungeon Command game (you should be!) check out One Inch Square‘s summary of the two sets, comparing their monster statistics.

Finally, sometimes resident artist Wesley Hall has posted a few pieces of Gamma World art he did for a project that never saw the light of day (Spoiler: GW Deck of Many Things). Only posted to Twitter, you’ll have to look here: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11 (We felt they were awesome enough to deserve a wider audience)

Blast From The Past (Weekly Roundup:  (Mostly) Post Gencon Wrapup Edition)

Every DM knows that inspiration for their campaign is all around us.  From paintings, to literature, to actual history.  If you’re looking for historical inspiration, check out Illuminerdy‘s primer on the ancient Mexican city of Chichen Itza, complete with campaign and plot hook ideas.
(8/13/2011) 

Weekly Roundup: Open Submission Window Halfway Closed Edition

Well, if you want to submit an article idea for Dungeon or Dragon magazine, the submission window for this cycle is just about halfway closed. You have until May 31, or you’ll have to wait until October. Get on it! Oh, and check out what sorts of things they’re looking for, and what they don’t really want.

PAX East made the MTV Geek News page. Check out what they thought the hottest board games were from this year’s convention.

On Dungeon Mastering this week, Keith Baker talked about how to set up a sandbox style game. The short version? Set up “scenes” instead of dungeon rooms.

And if you were lamenting the lack of WotC podcast content, lament no more. There’s a new podcast up, where they talk about Lords Of Waterdeep, among other things.

It’s kind of weird when two bloggers, independent of one another, cover the same topic in the same week. This week, The Id DM and Steve’s Gamer Blog both covered the topic of Campaign Endings. Considering the fact that most campaigns don’t end deliberately, it’s probably something we all need to work on.

Finally, on IntWisCha this week covered the topic of “How to Fail” and how failure can make for interesting story opportunities – they answer the question, “Why would someone choose to fail on a successful roll?”

Blast From The Past (Weekly Roundup: Dungeon Geomorph Dice Edition)

Then there was Dread Gazebo (with his fancy new blog layout!) who encouraged DMs to abandon the XP budget.  This, of course, sparked some debate, and Sarah Darkmagic weighed in with a counterpoint.
(4/23/11)

Weekly Roundup: Dice Tower Winner Edition

A couple of weeks ago, we announced a contest to give away a dice tower. Aaaaaand the winner is…… Benesky! Congrats! I’ll be contacting you shortly. On to the articles!

Extended Rest recounted a Thanksgiving Gamma World adventure he put together on the fly. We love flying by the seat of our pants, we love Gamma World, we love random tables, and heck, we love Thanksgiving too. So I guess this was bound to be roundup material.

Over at Rule of the Dice, they posted a rundown of the goods and bads of playing by blog (and how it’s different from playing by fourm). If you’re looking for an online play by post game, this is worth a read to understand the ins and outs.

There was an excellent discussion at Strange Magic about how elves aren’t just people with pointy ears, and how we can possibly roleplay in ways to set them apart from humans. This reminded us of discussion at the Gencon monster design seminar where the panelists were talking about “science fiction morality” and how “orcs AREN’T people too!”

If you’re looking for reviews of Heroes of the Feywild, we’ve got you covered. You can either check out the review over at NewbieDM, or read the review posted on Enworld by Neuroglyph Games.

Campaign Mastery posted a discussion of different types of plot structuring. This is worth a read, especially if you’re in the planning stages of a campaign. Also, check out the list of past articles on the topic at the end.

Finally, in cast you missed it, The ID DM posted a frakking THESIS, complete with research, graphs, and tables on the power creep he sees in 4e. Set aside some time for this one. Very well thought out.

Blast from the past (Weekly Roundup – Thanksgiving Edition)

Jared Von Hindman over at Wizards of the Coast wrote a highly entertaining and thought-provoking article about a town’s economy and motivations when adventurers show up.  There are some great ideas there for a “looks like a regular adventure, but looks can be deceiving” type adventure.  Just read it, you’ll see what I mean.

Weekly Roundup: The Deal With The Podcast

If you’re a regular listener to our podcast, you will most certainly have noticed that we haven’t posted one recently. The brief explanation is that Hamblin has been very busy with work, and has been unable to find time to record. No worries though, he should be freed up again around the end of December/beginning of January, and we plan to begin recording a regular podcast again. Until then, we’ll try and get at least one more out. So now you know.

We don’t usually link to ourselves, but in case you missed it, there’s one week left to win a Hirst Arts dice tower.

This article by Summerbird has an idea that’s too good to pass over even though it’s a few weeks old. Remember all those promo cards for games you’ll never play that you got at Gencon? Turns out you shouldn’t have trashed them.

Rules as Unwritten had some great ideas on how to use keywords in 4e. Power keywords like primal, cold, or divine have not been used up to their potential according to the author, and he proposes a truly radical way of using them that could turn your game on its head. (Classless D&D system, anyone?)

Have you been looking for some non-traditional adventure hooks? Check out Dungeon’s Master this week, where they list 10 adventure hooks your characters can find in a library. Lots of great ideas!

If you were a fan of the D&D cartoon from back in the day, you may want to check out the series “bible” which was posted on Geek Flag this week.

The Hydra DM posted a level 30 character as a monster stat block this past week, building on this older article by The ID DM.

Finally, congratulations to Leonine Roar, who just posted their 100th article! Check out their archives when you get a chance, lots of good stuff there!

Blast from the past (Weekly Roundup: Big Week for WotC Edition)

We enjoyed reading about the unique way that Thadeousc over at This Is My Game is running his new campaign.  No, we won’t tell you.  You’ll have to read about it yourself.

Note: We’ve been thinking about trying this for some time now – ideas like this that stick in our head is what makes reading other blogs great!

 

Weekly Roundup: Trying MapTool Edition

We’ve been playing around with MapTool this past week, and we’re very impressed by it. We do have a DDi subscription, so we will also be checking out the VT Beta. However, since a lot of our gaming friends do not have a subscription, we will be using MapTool as a backup. We will say that the learning curve is a little steep, and help can sometimes be hard to find, but once you get the hang of it, it’s a very powerful and easy to use program.

Dice Monkey reminded us that there’s lots of 3d terrain accessories to be found at the dollar store. We especially like the recommendation for miniature pine trees from miniature Christmas village kits.

Neuroglyph Games lamented the loss of talent in the 4e community, as well as the difficulty of 3rd party publishing for 4th edition. This article was triggered by the farewell of the At-Will guys.

Greywulf’s Lair opined that the D&D universe should be more like Games Workshop’s Warhammer 40k universe. (Go get a snack for this one, it’s long.)

The ID DM talked D&D design, freelancing, and how to write with WotC game designer Scott Fitzgerald. Lots of good advice and insight there, especially for aspiring freelancers.

Vanir over at Critical Hits talked about the danger of railroading an inside joke into your campaign. Our favorite quote in the article: my mantra for years both as a player and DM has been “there are other people at the table.”

Geek Ken talked about how much he misses scrolls in 4e, as well as some house rules he’s been using for them.

Finally, check out the Holiday Gift Guide for gamers series over at GameHead. Whether you’re a gamer, or are looking for gifts for a gamer in your life, this series is a fun read.

Blast from the Past (Weekly Roundup:  Gamma World Edition)

The Dungeon’s Master got us thinking about whether alignment is an important part of the 4e core rules, or if it’s simply become a byword.   We think that setting hard fast rules about what alignment is and isn’t had become too restrictive, and welcome the opportunities that a more open alignment system gives.

 

Weekly Roundup: Play A New RPG Month Is Underway Edition

 Well, it’s October, so that means that Play A New RPG Month is in full swing. Hopefully, you’ve been branching out with your group and trying something new. Be sure to check out the site, and weigh in on what you’ve been playing so that the moderators can keep track of all the participants. The link is in the sidebar there, or you can just click here.

The She DM posted a super easy to make, and really good looking set of tentacle miniatures. We love stuff like this.

If you liked all the contributions to the Winter is Coming blog carnival, you should definitely check out the carnival being hosted by A Man’s Brain Attic. Titled “A Night in the Lonesome October,” this one will be (predictably) horror/Halloween themed. If you’re a blogger, participate! If you’re not, keep an eye out for all the submissions.

 Daily Encounter proposed a new feat, and a whole pile of new cantrips that are full of flavor. Add them to your game, and see what your players do with them!

The ID DM discussed how to use scarcity to add tension and engagement in your game. As they always say… less is more.

If you remember a month or so ago, we highlighted the “adventure a day” challenge over at Asshat Paladins. The challenge is over, and you can check out a list of every single adventure idea posted. It’s quite a list, and would keep any DM busy for quite a while. (You’ll have to click through the links to specific blogs – they haven’t been compiled in a document, nor do I suspect they will be)

IntWisCha posted a short article on how to reconcile plot and mechanics when the two conspire against you.

Finally, Initiative or What posted an automated treasure generator. Free to download, all you need is Excel. Awesome!

Weekly Roundup: Winter is Coming Edition

By way of making up for not posting for the past week, we’ve decided to go “all in” this coming week.  We’ll be recording a podcast on Sunday (to post Monday), posting our Game Night article on Tuesday, and every other day this week will have articles for the Winter is Coming blog carnival.  Enjoy!

First up, if you’re looking for story ideas, check out the link posted by Risus TOTM this week. It’s a story idea generator over at the TV Tropes site. (If nothing else, this is a great way to waste even MORE time at the TV Tropes site…)

In the Eye of the Beholder spoke at length of the pros and cons of boxed text.  He also proposed a new way of presenting boxed text that is more streamlined and leaves room for a DM to leave his unique stamp on the situation.

Loremaster dealt with his thoughts on the (now extinct) “save or die” mechanic so prevalent in earlier editions.  It’s part of the “Dungeon Crawl System” series which deals with bringing an old school feel to 4th edition.

Speaking of old school, The ID DM got to play some Basic D&D again for the first time in years, and compared his first edition experience to fourth edition.

 There’s a great new series on This is My Game dealing with fun new uses for mundane items.  First up is the grappling hook.  (Also, check out the other new guest columns being written over there)

If you’re a DDI subscriber, be sure to check out Chatty DM‘s rules for 0 level characters in this month’s Dragon Magazine, as well as the adventure for 0 level characters in Dungeon.

Finally, someone on Twitter posted this article from Cooking and Hooking, who talked about a cool Hirst Arts gift she got for her husband. (No, not that kind of hooking)

Weekly Roundup: How We Find Our Articles Edition

We’ve been doing a weekly roundup for over six months now.  Some of you may be wondering, how do they find the blog articles for the Roving Band of Misfit’s Weekly Roundup?  Or maybe not.  Either way, we’re going to tell you.  There are several sources we have for articles:

  1. Twitter.  If someone we follow Tweets an interesting article, we give it a look.
  2. 4eblogs.com.  There’s no archive on this site, so if we don’t notice something in the first few days, we generally don’t notice it.  Also, the list of contributors to that site is short, and we like to keep the articles diverse.  So we don’t lean too heavily there.
  3. RPGbloggers.com.  As to the number of contributors, completely the opposite of 4eblogs.  Sometimes a single day’s worth of blog posts goes on for a few pages.  As to the amount of posts we have to sift through to find an interesting, relevant article… also the opposite.  We generally scan the headlines, and if something grabs our interest, we’ll read the article.  Since this site does have an archive, we can go back over the week’s blog postings at our leisure.

Next time, we’ll discuss how we pick articles, and what causes something to catch our eye.  But for now, some articles!

Paul from Blog of Holding posted an amazing graphic depicting all the monsters in MM1 by level and environment.  We can’t imagine how much time this took…

Dread Gazebo posted a homebrew skill specialization system for 4e that we really like.  Be sure to give him feedback (positive or negative) so he can refine the rules.

Every month, Wastex Games has been hosting a contest on their blog.  For May, the contest was “Tribes of the Land” where entrants were challenged to come up with a unique tribe of monsters.  We especially liked Wes Hall’s entry, which was presented this week: The Stone Raiders, a tribe of Cockatrice riding Goblins.  No, you read that right.

Trollish Delver had some interesting thoughts on why we may gravitate towards lower level characters.  You should weigh in on how you feel, as his musings are largely open-ended.  We’re especially interested in what The ID DM has to say, from a psychology standpoint… (As an aside, there’s a mention in the article of the Dungeon Crawl Classics; for more on that check out this article from Beyond the Black Gate)

Big Ball of No Fun posted a great way to get quick and easy building floorplans on the fly.  Just another reason to have a computer handy when you play.  (Don’t tell me that my players are the only ones who go off script and wander into random buildings….)

Finally, remember that episode of Community everyone was talking about a few months back?  The one where the cast plays D&D for the entire episode?  The A.V. Club posted an interview with Dan Harmon (Community’s creator) this week where he comments on the making of the episode.  You have to scroll down a bit; look for the picture of Chevy Chase holding the D&D adventure.

What cool articles did we miss this week?

Weekly Roundup: 100th Post Giveaway Edition

And the winners to Tuesday’s giveaway are…. James Whistler, Generic Fighter, and Edwin.  In case anyone is wondering how I pick winners, I count the number of entries, and then use random.org to generate random numbers.  Pretty simple, and (as far as I can tell) fair.  Now, some articles from this week:

Over at his own blog, Geek Ken asked an important question that deserves an answer: Where is the WotC support for Gamma World? 

There was lots of talk this week about the errata to Clerics.  Plenty of posts, but we thought we’d point out two: one by The ID DM, and a response by A Walk in the Dark. (p.s. You can find the class updates here)

For those of you who remember WotC hinting at the challenging adventure path they’re releasing, some teaser info was released on their site this week.  We look forward to testing our mettle!

Themes are a fairly new part of 4e D&D, and we were happy to find a good primer over at Temporary Hit Points.  There are a lot of good links to information about themes; if you want to know more, check it out.

Oh, and the Fourthcore Armory droped today over at Save vs. Death. Pick it up, it’s free!!

That’s all for this week kids.  If we missed any really cool articles, leave them in the comments!