Tag Archives: TheSheDM

Weekly Roundup: Plagmada Edition

Apparently, this has been on lots of people’s radar for about nine months now, but it’s only recently come to our attention: the site Plagmada.org (Play Generated Map and Document Archive). It’s an archive of hand drawn dungeons and adventures, mostly written by us gamers back when we were young gamers.  And bonus! They’re now running a Kickstarter that you can check out if you’re into that sort of thing. Either way, the archive is definitely worth browsing. Lots of nostalgia to be had. Go get some!

First up, the submission window for Dungeon and Dragon is now open – you can check out the submission guidelines for this window here.

Thoughtcrime Games is bringing their 4th Edition Worldbreakers into 13th Age. You may remember them as the At-Will guys. See how they tweaked the Worldbreaker rules for a new system.

If you’re looking for a free adventure this week, look no further than The Dungeon Oracle who posted an awesome fourthcore style adventure entitled Colossus of the Shattered Moon. It’s system neutral, so anyone can use it. Great for a one shot.

The She DM had a great guest post this week on theology in your game. In a world where many gods is normal, what does religion look like to the average person? This series aims to explore.

Dungeon’s Master had a post on collaborative dungeon design. Yes, we’ve heard about collaborative worldbuilding, and even group character creation, but dungeon design? Check it out.

Reality Refracted discussed using a prison break as a campaign starter.  How it would work, and why you should try it.

Everyone loves a good barfight, but not everyone loves the boring slugfest that sometimes results. To add a little flavor and a lot of simplicity to your next barfight, check out The Land of Nod‘s bar fight matrix.

Finally, in his WotC blog, Jester wrote about leaving room for improv, both in the setting of your game as well as the rules of your game.

Blast From The Past (Weekly Roundup: Next Few Weeks Edition)

Dungeon’s Master wrote about the 8 things they’ve learned by playing in the Encounters program.  These are good lessons for anyone just picking up the DM mantle, and good reminders for those of us who have been wearing it for a long time.

Weekly Roundup: Ennies Voting Is Open Edition

Voting for the Ennies is only open for the next week, so head on over there and vote (the link opens in a new window so you can let it sit while you peruse the roundup). Befoe you head over there though, we want to note this, which is in the voting instructions: Before voting, please take the time to familiarize yourself with the products. The product titles link to their publisher’s websites, allowing you to learn more about that product. The Ennies are not a popularity contest. Don’t vote for something just because it was made by a publisher you like, even if you haven’t seen the actual product. Take a little bit of time to get to know all the products in a category, or don’t vote in that category at all. Let’s make this the best Ennies ever!

This week, The She DM wrote up a great analysis of how much the new WotC Dungeon Command game costs vs. how much you’d pay on the secondary market for the same miniatures. If you’re just going to buy Dungeon Command for the miniatures, this article is a must read.

Reality Refracted has some great advice for long time GMs who make the switch to the other side of the screen. Sometimes it’s difficult to go from GM to player, and this is some great advice for those who change up their role.

Campaign Mastery wrote a very in-depth article on investigative adventures, and the different ways to lead PCs from Mystery to Solution. This is a long one folks, so set some time aside, but definitely worth a read if you’re thinking about this type of adventure in the near future. (We also have some advice from a while back…)

If you’re looking for something more bite-sized, check out the quick paragraph that Joe the Lawyer wrote about what makes for the best D&D groups.

If you have little ones, and love Gencon, make sure you check out Dread Gazebo‘s article on bringing kids to Gencon. Of course, every child is different, but the advice here is solid. (We might also note that this article goes hand in hand with the one by Avy Valentine which was linked last week.)

Sly Flourish posted some great advice on how to tie PCs to a prepublished adventure. For many DMs, the inability to fit something prepublished into their campaign keeps them from using prepublished resources. Try some of these tricks to personalize prepublished adventures.

Finally, you may have heard about the new RPG coming out called 13th Age. And you may have some questions. If so, check out the 13 facts about 13th Age posted this week at their site. Looks like a fun system.

Blast From The Past (Weekly Roundup: Loot! Edition)

A Character For Every Game [now Dyson’s Dodecahedron] posted a roundup of maps from around the blogosphere.  If you’re as into maps as he is, check it out.  It’s a great source of bloggers who regularly post maps to steal.  We love a good roundup!

Weekly Roundup: DnDpr Edition

If you haven’t seen it yet, you should check out the new DnDpr Tumblr, which is a spoof on NPR. So public radio from a high fantasy point of view. It’s pretty funny, and we hope to hear a lot more from these guys in the future. On to the articles…

First up this week, we have a great feel good story that made us smile. If someone tells you gaming is a waste of time, just point them to this story from Breakfast for Owlbears.

Neuroglyph Games had a great article on how the new bounded accuracy rules will change the game. Some great thoughts, and even a little bit of D&D history.

In case you hadn’t heard, there is going to be a new D&D movie released on the SyFy channel titled “The Book of Vile Darkness.” After seeing the trailer, Randall over at This Is My Game posted his thoughts (including what they should have made).

IntWisCha wrote an article this week that responds to the contention that you’re not roleplaying if you’re using disassociated mechanics. Don’t worry if you don’t know what that is… there’s an explanation.

It’s no secret that WotC is planning on making the rules of D&D Next modular. It’s being touted as a feature. Well, this week Jester made a pretty comprehensive list of optional rules modules that he hopes to see.

Starting a new campaign sometime soon? Did your character just die, and you need to make a new one? Check out the advice Reality Refracted gave on creating character backstory.

The Douchey DM had a great idea for making a better DM screen. When you’re familiar with the rules, what do you use that real estate for? Try this, and see how your game goes.

Finally, The She DM posted a short article with her thoughts about how the loss of interrupts in the current D&D Next rules has made the game worse for her. We’d tend to agree, and (on the podcast) have often spoken about how interrupts engage players even when it’s not their turn.

Blast From The Past (Weekly Roundup: Beyond the Stat Block Edition)

NewbieDM had a guest article on making flying stands for minis.  We’ve been thinking about doing this very thing for a while now (even have the extendable “antennas” sitting around here somewhere), so it was nice to see a tutorial to save on trial and error.  These look really good!

Weekly Roundup: Site of the Year Voting Edition

As you may or may not know, Stuffer Shack has an “RPG Site of the Year” contest every year. As their site of the month for last September, Roving Band of Misfits was automatically entered into the contest. Without going into too much detail, you’ll be able to vote for our site on Thursday of this week, and we encourage you to do so! (Don’t worry, we’ll remind you again)

If you missed the D&D Next seminar at PAX East last week, you can catch the whole thing over at ENWorld. This is a must see if you want the most up to date info from the designers themselves.

Blog of Holding had some deep thoughts about monsters this week – what kinds of traces do the monsters leave behind? What kinds of clues would they leave? Not only does “Monster Traces” lend a sense of realism to the campaign, but it also can create mystery, or even a sense of dread for the players.

Looking for an interesting encounter this week? Check out the D&D burglar alarm encounter presented by Breakfast for Owlbears.

Thoughtcrime Games posted some thoughts on motivations for characters that extend beyond mere survival. Good thoughts, especially when we realize that our days are filled with more motivation than “survival instinct.” What drives your character?

Of course, we can never let a good arts & crafts article go by without adding it to the roundup. This week, The She DM added even more tentacles to your box of minis. (You may remember the article we did a while back that added onto her original tentacle article)

Finally, some thoughts from Critical Hits on the different kinds of mapping that exists in D&D combat – gridded, theater of the imagination, and more. What are the pros and cons?

Blast From The Past (Weekly Roundup: Changes to the Podcast Edition)

Neuroglyph Games had a thought-provoking article on character optimization.  Agree or disagree?  Leave them a comment!  (We do see his point, though we wish he would have also addressed living campaigns)

Weekly Roundup: Play A New RPG Month Is Underway Edition

 Well, it’s October, so that means that Play A New RPG Month is in full swing. Hopefully, you’ve been branching out with your group and trying something new. Be sure to check out the site, and weigh in on what you’ve been playing so that the moderators can keep track of all the participants. The link is in the sidebar there, or you can just click here.

The She DM posted a super easy to make, and really good looking set of tentacle miniatures. We love stuff like this.

If you liked all the contributions to the Winter is Coming blog carnival, you should definitely check out the carnival being hosted by A Man’s Brain Attic. Titled “A Night in the Lonesome October,” this one will be (predictably) horror/Halloween themed. If you’re a blogger, participate! If you’re not, keep an eye out for all the submissions.

 Daily Encounter proposed a new feat, and a whole pile of new cantrips that are full of flavor. Add them to your game, and see what your players do with them!

The ID DM discussed how to use scarcity to add tension and engagement in your game. As they always say… less is more.

If you remember a month or so ago, we highlighted the “adventure a day” challenge over at Asshat Paladins. The challenge is over, and you can check out a list of every single adventure idea posted. It’s quite a list, and would keep any DM busy for quite a while. (You’ll have to click through the links to specific blogs – they haven’t been compiled in a document, nor do I suspect they will be)

IntWisCha posted a short article on how to reconcile plot and mechanics when the two conspire against you.

Finally, Initiative or What posted an automated treasure generator. Free to download, all you need is Excel. Awesome!

Weekly Roundup: Loot! Edition

You’ve heard of Woot! right?  It’s a deal-a-day site that has several shootoffs (shirt.woot, wine.woot, moofi.woot, etc.) that offer a deal on some product every day.  Well, just this week, we discovered a new deal-a-day site like Woot!, except dedicated to all things gaming.  The site?  Loot!  Check it out now (there won’t be a deal today because they don’t post on weekends).  And thanks to Thadeous of This Is My Game for the link.  Oh and also, on a totally unrelated note, you can vote for the Ennies here.

Dice of Doom had some great ways to scale back the wealth of the PCs in your game without sparking a mutiny.  We especially like the “con man” idea.

Neogrognard posted a few reasons why he feels 4e threw itself under a bus.  Agree or disagree, this article is worth a read.

A Character For Every Game posted a roundup of maps from around the blogosphere.  If you’re as into maps as he is, check it out.  It’s a great source of bloggers who regularly post maps to steal.  We love a good roundup!

TheSheDM proposed a really cool technique for making encounter maps on your erasable mat.  Be sure to read the comments at the bottom, there are some great ideas there, too. We will definitely be trying this one.

And finally, something so awful, it’s awesome.  Check the link in this post from Joe the Lawyers Wondrous Imaginings for a teaser video created by TSR back in the 90’s.  Apparently, they were dabbling in board games that are played alongside a VHS tape.  Thanks YouTube!

Until next week….