Tag Archives: This Is My Game

Weekly Roundup: PBS Idea Channel Edition

This week, the Youtube PBS Idea channel emailed us. They recently posted a video entitled “Can Dungeons & Dragons Make You A Confident And Successful Person?” It’s an interesting discussion, and makes some good points. It’s a fun video to watch in its entirety, but if you want to skip the whole “What is D&D? How do you play?” bit, go to the 2:50 mark. Thought provoking, and you can leave comments that they’ll respond to in a future episode. Incidentally, they cover other nerdy topics like “Is Dr. Who a Religion?” and “What do MP3s and Magic Spells Have In Common?”

If you’re looking for a good Halloween adventure to run for your group, look no further than A Walk In The Dark who announced intentions to publish just such a module. Keep an eye on this one folks.

If you’re looking for some interesting loot to add to your next adventure, why not a treasure map? It’s an adventure hook within the loot! Check out The Dungeon’s Master for details.

At The Howling Tower this week, Steve Winter looks at magic items in D&D Next. Specifically, should characters having magic items be assumed in the setting, or is there a better way to handle them?

It’s been a couple of months since Gencon, so it’s fun to look back at a newbie’s experience. Check out how 20 Foot Radius fared in his first Gencon ever. (Also, I met Alton at Gencon; seemed like he was having a pretty good time!) If you’re looking for more Gencon retrospectives, This Is My Game had a short series recently as well.

If you’re into real medieval history, then check out The Wargaming Site this week, where they cover everything you need to know about the English longbow.

If you’re interested in the reprint of the Dungeon! game, you can check out an unboxing over at Wired Geek Dad. Nostalgia, here we come!

Finally, we were very interested in the recent release of the Midgard Campaign Setting. While there isn’t a 4e specific version, we may still pick it up for the fluff. This looks like a very unique and complete setting. We also have some fun ideas for a campaign there, stay tuned. There were reviews this week at The Iron Tavern and also at Stargazer’s World.

Blast From The Past (Weekly Roundup: One Last Winter Is Coming Link Edition)

Stuffer Shack promised to multiply your game’s fun by ten by adding a simple house rule.

Weekly Roundup: Columbus Day Edition

Tomorrow is Columbus Day. A day when we celebrate exploration and risk taking in the name of adventure, treasure, and discovery – so a great holiday for D&Ders to celebrate, even if you’re not from America. Oh, and if you have the day off, enjoy that too.

This week, Thoughtcrime Games had a very thought-provoking post on the role of story in your RPG game. How do we prepare story before the game? The answer may surprise you.

Coincidentally, The Alexandrian had an anecdote from this week as well that illustrates the Thoughtcrime Games article perfectly. Might be time to reevaluate your idea of story in RPGs…

DMG 42 started a series this week on a Megadungeon campaign he’s running. We stole some inspiration from him for our summer campaign this year, so we’ll be watching this series with interest.

Froths of 4e introduced a way to allow the creation of new magic spells through “spell research.” With the way 4e gives special powers to every class, we don’t see why this wouldn’t work for other classes too, just call it something different (e.g. “Martial Training”)

If you’re looking to try a new RPG, we were intrigued by the GM-less “Committee For The Exploration Of Mysteries” presented at This Is My Game this week. At the very least, good for a couple of one shots.

If you follow The Chatty DM on Twitter, you may have noticed that he traveled to France recently. Getting out of your day to day routine is a great way to find new plot inspirations; here are a two that he got on his travels over at Critical Hits.

On the arts & crafts front, check out Dread Gazebo‘s tutorial on making your own portable wargaming table for a couple of bucks.

Big Ball Of No Fun asks if character death and lethality are myths in all editions of the game, not just the newer ones.

Reality Refracted takes a look at the social contract around the gaming table – which tenets do you play by?

Finally, if you’re looking for something to listen to instead of read, or if you’re looking for advice on submitting pitches to Dungeon and Dragon, check out The Tome Show this week.

Blast From The Past (Weekly Roundup: Winter Is Coming Edition)

First up, if you’re looking for story ideas, check out the link posted by Risus TOTM this week. It’s a story idea generator over at the TV Tropes site. (If nothing else, this is a great way to waste even MORE time at the TV Tropes site…)

Weekly Roundup: Decompressing From Gencon Edition

Well, another Gencon has come and gone, and scores of nerds across the world (the world!) have seen a drop in their work productivity this past week due to something known as “Gencon Hangover.” We had a great time, and hope everyone at our tables did as well. As for everything else we did there, well, what happens at Gencon stays at Gencon. Wait, is that right? Hmmm…. at any rate, we assure you it’s not as mysterious (or naughty) as it sounds.

If you’ve never been to Gencon, and want a blow by blow summary from a noob, look no further than the great summary posted by The Id DM this week. (Including the fact that there also happened to be a bike rally going on at the same time) If you want a more veteran perspective, you’ll have to check out DeadOrcs’ post on This Is My Game.

Of course, if you’re looking for more Gencon goodness, you can’t go wrong with all the WotC seminars on one page, for your viewing pleasure. If you’d rather listen to them than watch them, then it’s over to The Tome Show for you! (Or you could check out a rough summary on the Forbes blog.)

Neuroglyph Games also talked a bit about the Gencon seminars, and why they convinced him to keep playtesting.

RPG Musings is starting a new campaign, and shared some steps they go through when planning. Good thoughts, as it seems September is a common time to start new campaigns.

Merric’s Musings has been reviewing old 1e and 2e adventure modules lately. This link is to a review of The Secret of Bone Hill, but there are plenty more on the blog. (We feel this is self-evident, but also feel it’s necessary to note that there are spoilers involved.)

The Other Side asked this week if the OSR (Old School Renaissance) is dead. Later this week, a followup was posted.

Of course, the other HUGE news this week that everyone was watching was the amazingly successful Reaper Bones Kickstarter. Just this week, 1000 Foot General posted a review on this new casting material.

And if you’re interested in the new Dungeon Command game (you should be!) check out One Inch Square‘s summary of the two sets, comparing their monster statistics.

Finally, sometimes resident artist Wesley Hall has posted a few pieces of Gamma World art he did for a project that never saw the light of day (Spoiler: GW Deck of Many Things). Only posted to Twitter, you’ll have to look here: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11 (We felt they were awesome enough to deserve a wider audience)

Blast From The Past (Weekly Roundup:  (Mostly) Post Gencon Wrapup Edition)

Every DM knows that inspiration for their campaign is all around us.  From paintings, to literature, to actual history.  If you’re looking for historical inspiration, check out Illuminerdy‘s primer on the ancient Mexican city of Chichen Itza, complete with campaign and plot hook ideas.
(8/13/2011) 

Weekly Roundup: DnDpr Edition

If you haven’t seen it yet, you should check out the new DnDpr Tumblr, which is a spoof on NPR. So public radio from a high fantasy point of view. It’s pretty funny, and we hope to hear a lot more from these guys in the future. On to the articles…

First up this week, we have a great feel good story that made us smile. If someone tells you gaming is a waste of time, just point them to this story from Breakfast for Owlbears.

Neuroglyph Games had a great article on how the new bounded accuracy rules will change the game. Some great thoughts, and even a little bit of D&D history.

In case you hadn’t heard, there is going to be a new D&D movie released on the SyFy channel titled “The Book of Vile Darkness.” After seeing the trailer, Randall over at This Is My Game posted his thoughts (including what they should have made).

IntWisCha wrote an article this week that responds to the contention that you’re not roleplaying if you’re using disassociated mechanics. Don’t worry if you don’t know what that is… there’s an explanation.

It’s no secret that WotC is planning on making the rules of D&D Next modular. It’s being touted as a feature. Well, this week Jester made a pretty comprehensive list of optional rules modules that he hopes to see.

Starting a new campaign sometime soon? Did your character just die, and you need to make a new one? Check out the advice Reality Refracted gave on creating character backstory.

The Douchey DM had a great idea for making a better DM screen. When you’re familiar with the rules, what do you use that real estate for? Try this, and see how your game goes.

Finally, The She DM posted a short article with her thoughts about how the loss of interrupts in the current D&D Next rules has made the game worse for her. We’d tend to agree, and (on the podcast) have often spoken about how interrupts engage players even when it’s not their turn.

Blast From The Past (Weekly Roundup: Beyond the Stat Block Edition)

NewbieDM had a guest article on making flying stands for minis.  We’ve been thinking about doing this very thing for a while now (even have the extendable “antennas” sitting around here somewhere), so it was nice to see a tutorial to save on trial and error.  These look really good!

Weekly Roundup: Impending Scheduling Change Edition

In the next few weeks, I’ll be changing the article schedule on the site. For those of you who pay attention, you’ve noticed that I post articles on Tues/Thurs and the weekly roundup on Sunday. I’ll be moving the posting schedule to Wed/Fri; the weekly roundup will remain on Sunday. This is most likely a temporary change – Wed/Fri is more convenient for my life right now, but when things get back to normal, I’ll probably go back to Tues/Thurs. So if you show up one Tuesday, and there’s no article, well, that’s what happened.

Over at This Is My Game, DeadOrcs posted some great thoughts on using a wizard’s implement as a weapon. Depending upon what implement you use, you get to add a special rider to your attacks. Worth a look. (We also love the new site art for the articles!)

At ENWorld, site owner Morrus started a discussion on why he hopes the Forgotten Realms isn’t updated for D&D 5e. We certainly see his points (especially the comment about kitchen sinks), though coming at the argument from a perspective of “I don’t care about the Forgotten Realms, so you shouldn’t either” might not necessarily win people over. We would, however, like to see what Wizards could come up with for a brand new setting. Maybe another Eberron style contest?

We loved the article by Vanir over at Critical Hits this week. We too would love to see digital tools opened up to third parties to see what the community comes up with (even if a lot of the technical jargon went over our heads…).

With all the talk of the next edition of D&D, Bat in the Attic posted a list of all the versions of D&D. It’s basically just the list, but an interesting read nonetheless.

John Du Bois followed up on the article he wrote for us this week with an article on his own blog where he discusses the difference between a “judge” and a “DM.” For those not in the know, “judge” is the commonly used term for DMs who run adventures for living campaigns.

Howling Tower discussed the problem of illusory math on his site this week – that is, the escalation of monster AC that keeps pace with the party’s to-hit bonuses.

Way back in 2010, we wrote an article on ship combat. As a result, we’re always on the lookout for good ship combat mechanics, so we were happy to see Troll in the Corner post an article on just that topic this week.

Finally, in case you missed it this week, Wizards of the Coast announced that it will be re-releasing the first edition D&D core rulebooks. Keep an eye out for them starting in April!

Blast From The Past (Weekly Roundup: Finished Sea Maiden Edition)

Board Enterprises had some interesting thoughts about whether or not you should map out locations in your campaign.  While a definitive solution to the problem was not presented, it certainly gave us something to think about.
(1/16/11)

Weekly Roundup: Coming Up On 200 Edition

It’s crazy for us to think, but it seems as though we’re coming up on 200 posts. This one is 198 – it seems like just yesterday we were celebrating 100 – unfortunately, we won’t be doing a giveaway for 200 since we just did a giveaway for our 1 year anniversary. Hopefully, by pointing you to some articles we can distract you from that, and deflect some of the nerd rage.

Arcane Springboard had a great analysis of the “Peak/End” rule and how it applies to a gaming session and even a campaign. Check it out at This Is My Game.

If you’re looking for a design challenge this week, check out A Walk In The Dark. A treasure vault has been presented, and there’s a contest to populate it!

Daily Encounter has announced a new blog carnival. If you recall, we participated in “Winter is Coming” and “A Night In The Lonesome October,” and will be participating in this one as well. They also posted a great article this week by guest author @DigitalDraco entitled “Back to Basics.”

Initiative or What? had some ideas to “automate” monsters. Make some general action “bundles” and roll a die to see what they do. Check out the specifics, and weigh in on how you would use it.

Gamer Assembly had some general thoughts about 4e. Head on over there and weigh in with your own opinions. They’re a new blog, so show them some love!

Rules as UNwritten had some great ideas for challenging players at upper paragon and epic.

We’re not sure how we missed this one, but friends of the podcast Dice of Doom have been developing their own RPG entitled Goblins! Considering the fact that they’ve been sampling an RPG a month for over a year now, we expect the game to be very well thought out. And if there’s a Kickstarter for it, we’ll be sure to post it in the sidebar there.

If you’re looking for a free holiday-themed adventure that doesn’t include a “jolly old elf,” look no further than Skyland Games’ take on “A Christmas Carol.” Instead of taking a break over the holidays, break out the eggnog and dice!

Finally, The RPG Doctor had a great post this week on how to teach D&D in a one-on-one setting. We’ve been thinking a lot recently about one-on-one D&D with experienced players, so this was a great new angle.

Blast From The Past (Weekly Roundup: Big Excel Project)

NewbieDM gave his take on what a 1 player campaign might look like.  While it’s mostly conjecture at this point, we hope he actually tries some of his ideas, and shares that too.

Weekly Roundup: Winter is Coming Edition

By way of making up for not posting for the past week, we’ve decided to go “all in” this coming week.  We’ll be recording a podcast on Sunday (to post Monday), posting our Game Night article on Tuesday, and every other day this week will have articles for the Winter is Coming blog carnival.  Enjoy!

First up, if you’re looking for story ideas, check out the link posted by Risus TOTM this week. It’s a story idea generator over at the TV Tropes site. (If nothing else, this is a great way to waste even MORE time at the TV Tropes site…)

In the Eye of the Beholder spoke at length of the pros and cons of boxed text.  He also proposed a new way of presenting boxed text that is more streamlined and leaves room for a DM to leave his unique stamp on the situation.

Loremaster dealt with his thoughts on the (now extinct) “save or die” mechanic so prevalent in earlier editions.  It’s part of the “Dungeon Crawl System” series which deals with bringing an old school feel to 4th edition.

Speaking of old school, The ID DM got to play some Basic D&D again for the first time in years, and compared his first edition experience to fourth edition.

 There’s a great new series on This is My Game dealing with fun new uses for mundane items.  First up is the grappling hook.  (Also, check out the other new guest columns being written over there)

If you’re a DDI subscriber, be sure to check out Chatty DM‘s rules for 0 level characters in this month’s Dragon Magazine, as well as the adventure for 0 level characters in Dungeon.

Finally, someone on Twitter posted this article from Cooking and Hooking, who talked about a cool Hirst Arts gift she got for her husband. (No, not that kind of hooking)

Weekly Roundup: Hirst Model on Ebay Edition

It took us about a month, but we finally have the final model from the Gencon Fourthcore Deathmatch up on Ebay. It didn’t sell at the convention, so now you can get it for a steal – with nowhere to store it, I just want it out of my house. The auction ends in 7 days, so happy bidding! There are a LOT of modular dungeon pieces AND accessories in this model. The auction can be found here.  And a few of the week’s articles can be found here:

We’re pretty much lazy dungeon masters around here, so the article over at Sly Flourish this week was right up our alley. Check it out for some great tips.

Of course, if you’re a lazy PLAYER, you’ll want a copy of the cheat sheets presented by Temporary Hit Points this week.

If you’re lucky enough to live near a game store that is carrying Mordenkainen’s Magnificent Emporium, go pick it up! If you’re not, you’ll have to wait until Sept 20th, and settle for the review over at This Is My Game.

Have kids? Young kids? Maybe it’s time you let your 4 year old DM! That was the gist of the article at Kids Dungeon Adventure this week. 

This one isn’t an article, per se, but we thought it was full of good info that most people would find helpful. It’s a thread on Reddit discussing how to organize your minis, maps, and other RPG accessories.

Finally, the current contests we’re aware of include the Obsidian Portal/D20 Monkey caption contest, and the Flagons and DragonsFlagons High” fantasy toast contest. Check them out!

Do you know of any contests we didn’t list?

Weekly Roundup: (Mostly) Post Gencon Wrapup Edition

We’re back from Gencon! Check out tomorrow’s podcast for Benoit’s thoughts and experiences (among other things).  Until then, here’s some Gencon goodness in the Weekly Roundup (plus some other stuff).

First, we’ll do a quick roundup of bloggers that blogged about their experiences at Gencon this week:

Also, we would be remiss if we did not provide a link to the Ennie winners (click through to the pdf).  Congratulations to everyone who won!

Finally, Critical Hits did a great summary of the Wizards of the Coast New Products seminar.  If you want to know what’s in the pipeline over at WotC, check it out. Also, Alphastream included a few links on his blog to followup information on the new products, as well as his thoughts.

And then some non-Gencon articles we noticed:

Every DM knows that inspiration for their campaign is all around us.  From paintings, to literature, to actual history.  If you’re looking for historical inspiration, check out Illuminerdy‘s primer on the ancient Mexican city of Chichen Itza, complete with campaign and plot hook ideas.

Heroes of Shadow posted a brief overview and review of the Neverwinter Fortune cards.  We’ll be discussing them in tomorrow’s podcast as well, so tune in for that.

At-Will wrote about why it’s hard to make hard encounters.

Finally, where current events and gaming meet, we find this story about some London looters and a Games Workshop store. (Edit: We’re not sure if this story is for real)

Whose Gencon wrapup did we miss?  Link it in the comments!

Weekly Roundup: 2011 GenCon Schedule Edition

In case you wanted to stop by at GenCon and say hi, below is Benoit’s schedule.  He will be judging events all weekend, so if you want to buy him a beer, he probably won’t say no.

  • Thursday:
    • 1-6  LFR Calimshan 3-2 (part 2 of the series)
    • 7-Midnight  LFR Calimshan 3-2 (part 2 of the series)
  • Friday:
    • 8-1  LFR Calimshan 3-3 (part 3 of the series)
    • 1-6 Fourthcore Deathmatch (Stop by to see the models!)
    • 7-Midnight  LFR Calimshan 3-2 (part 2 of the series)
  • Saturday:
    • 8-1  LFR Calimshan 3-2 (part 2 of the series)
    • 1-6  LFR Calimshan 3-3 (part 3 of the series)
    • 7-Midnight  LFR Calimshan 3-2 (part 2 of the series)
  • Sunday:
    • 8-1  LFR Calimshan 3-3 (part 3 of the series)

He’ll also have some stuff to give away to anyone stopping by, which will be highlighted in next week’s roundup.

In case you missed it, we did a guest post for Ben’s RPG Pile this week.  He’s doing an A to Z series of dungeon accessories, minis, and play aids.  We took the letter F for… well, you’ll just have to head over there to find out.

At-Will posted a cool article by Jeff Greiner (of The Tome Show) explaining how he dealt with a series of magical explosions in his game.  Some great ideas there for making an effect more interesting to players.

Speaking of Gencon, Sea of Stars posted some advice for Gencon that’s worth a read, especially if this is your first con.

This is My Game posted a list of apps that you might want for your iPhone/iPad to help you at the table (or lighten your bag).  We will also add iPlay4e to the list.

Dice Monkey started a new series hacking Gamma World into traditional D&D. Also note the link in the article to Chaos Grenade, who is doing something similar.

Finally, over at Critical Hits, Dixon Trimline wrote about players’ fear of dying in 4e (or lack thereof), and why he’s not worried about characters that don’t.

So what cool articles did you find this week?